[cleanairuk_news] Health Effects of Air Quality and Noise - update July 2014

contact at cleanairuk.org contact at cleanairuk.org
Tue Aug 12 12:27:04 BST 2014


* Health Effects of Air Quality and Noise - update July 2014 *

By Barbara Rimmington, Researcher, East End Quality of Life Initiative

(Previous edition - June/July 2014:  
http://cleanairuk.org/pipermail/news_cleanairuk.org/2014-July/000072.html

Index page for Health Effects of Air Quality and Noise:  
http://www.cleanairuk.org/health-air-pollution.html)

*Notice*

Conference: Air Quality and Health in Sheffield Conference, Friday  
17th October 2014. Speakers include Dr Ian Mudway from Kings College  
London, Alan Andrews from Client Earth, and Councillor Jack Scott from  
Sheffield City Council. The conference will be chaired by Jack Peace,  
editor of the Air Quality Bulletin. Book online  
(https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/air-quality-and-health-in-sheffield-tickets-12134934917?gws_rd=ssl).

*CONTENTS*

1) Particulate air pollution and preeclampsia: a source-based analysis

2) Nitrogen dioxide and mortality: review and meta-analysis of  
long-term studies

3) Comparison of ambient airborne PM2.5, PM2.5 absorbance and nitrogen  
dioxide ratios measured in 1999 and 2009 in three areas in Europe

4) Urban air quality: The challenge of traffic non-exhaust emissions

5) A study of air pollutants influencing life expectancy and longevity  
from spatial perspective in China

6) Real-driving emissions from cars and light commercial vehicles –  
Results from 13 years remote sensing at Zurich/CH

7) The influence of roadside vegetation barriers on airborne  
nanoparticles and pedestrians exposure under varying wind conditions

8) Limited effect of urban tree vegetation on NO2 and O3  
concentrations near a traffic route

9) Effects of prenatal community violence and ambient air pollution on  
childhood wheeze in an urban population

10) Decline of ambient air pollution levels due to measures to control  
automobile emissions and effects on the prevalence of respiratory and  
allergic disorders among children in Japan

11) Airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) and the prevalence of allergic  
conjunctivitis in Japan

12) Effects of ambient levels of traffic-derived air pollution on the  
ocular surface: Analysis of symptoms, conjunctival goblet cell count  
and mucin 5AC gene expression

13) Association of short-term increases in ambient air pollution and  
timing of initial asthma diagnosis among medicaid-enrolled children in  
a metropolitan area

14) Air pollution and limb defects: A matched-pairs case-control study  
in Taiwan

15) Associations between prenatal exposure to air pollution, small for  
gestational age, and term low birthweight in a state-wide birth cohort

16) Road traffic noise, sleep and mental health

17) Updated exposure-response relationship between road traffic noise  
and coronary heart diseases: A meta-analysis

- o -

1) Particulate air pollution and preeclampsia: a source-based analysis

Payam Dadvand, Bart Ostro, Fulvio Amato, Francesc Figueras, María-Cruz  
Minguillón, David Martinez, Xavier Basagaña, Xavier Querol, Mark  
Nieuwenhuijsen

Risk of preeclampsia was associated with exposure to PM10 brake dust  
and combined traffic-related sources.

Occup Environ Med 2014;71:570-577 - read abstract  
(http://oem.bmj.com/content/71/8/570.abstract.html?etoc)

- o -

2) Nitrogen dioxide and mortality: review and meta-analysis of  
long-term studies

Annunziata Faustini, Regula Rapp, Francesco Forastiere

There is evidence of a long-term effect of NO2 on mortality as great  
as that of PM2.5. An independent effect of NO2 emerged from  
multipollutant models.

ERJ February 20, 2014 erj01147-2013 - read abstract  
(http://www.erj.ersjournals.com/content/early/2014/02/20/09031936.00114713.abstract)

- o -

3) Comparison of ambient airborne PM2.5, PM2.5 absorbance and nitrogen  
dioxide ratios measured in 1999 and 2009 in three areas in Europe

John L. Durant, Rob Beelen, Marloes Eeftens, Kees Meliefste, Josef  
Cyrys, Joachim Heinrich, Tom Bellander, Marie Lewné, Bert Brunekreef,  
Gerard Hoek

Epidemiological studies often use nitrogen dioxide (NO2) or proximity  
to roads to characterize exposure to more health-relevant pollutants  
(e.g., fine particles or black carbon aerosol) in vehicle exhaust. Due  
to the introduction of diesel-soot filters, particle-to-NO2 ratios may  
have decreased, but little information is available about these ratios  
over time. Our study aim was to evaluate the change in particle-to-NO2  
ratios between 1999 and 2009.

Science of The Total Environment 487, 15 July 2014, 290–298 - read  
abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969714005130)

4) Urban air quality: The challenge of traffic non-exhaust emissions

Fulvio Amato, Flemming R. Cassee, Hugo A.C. Denier van der Gon, Robert  
Gehrig, Mats Gustafsson, Wolfgang Hafner, Roy M. Harrison, Magdalena  
Jozwicka, Frank J. Kelly, Teresa Moreno, Andre S.H. Prevot, Martijn  
Schaap, Jordi Sunyer, Xavier Querol

Only few in vivo toxicity and epidemiological studies focused  
specifically on non-exhaust sources. Further experiments are needed to  
better separate individual contributions and health effects. Need of  
understanding of the interaction between road surface texture,  
moisture, chemistry, dust load and dust emission. Poor emission  
inventorying on resuspension and heavy metals. The optimal mitigation  
strategy for each climatic region is still unknown.

Journal of Hazardous Materials 275, 30 June 2014, 31–36 - read  
abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S030438941400315X)

- o -

5) A study of air pollutants influencing life expectancy and longevity  
from spatial perspective in China

Li Wang, BingganWei, Yonghua Li, Hairong Li, Fengying Zhang, Mark  
Rosenberg, Linsheng Yang, Jixia Huang, Thomas Krafft, Wuyi Wang

Using GWR to investigate the spatial correlations between health and  
air pollutants. Difference of 10 μg/m3 in SO2 can cause adjusted 0.28  
year in life expectancy. Difference of 10 μg/m3 in PM10 can lead to a  
difference of 2.23 in longevity ratio. Per capita GDP was positively  
associating with life expectancy in China.
Science of The Total Environment 487, 15 July 2014, 57–64 - read  
abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S004896971400494X)

- o -

6) Real-driving emissions from cars and light commercial vehicles –  
Results from 13 years remote sensing at Zurich/CH

Yuche Chen, Jens Borken-Kleefeld

Real-driving emission factors from 13 years of on-road remote vehicle  
sensing. NOx emissions from diesel cars and light commercial vehicles  
several times above limit value. Confirming HBEFA emission factors,  
but discrepancy with London remote sensing emissions. Significant  
uncertainty in primary NO2 exhaust emissions.

Atmospheric Environment 88, May 2014, 157–164 - read absract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231014000594)

- o -

7) The influence of roadside vegetation barriers on airborne  
nanoparticles and pedestrians exposure under varying wind conditions

Abdullah N. Al-Dabbous, Prashant Kumar

Sequential measurements of nanoparticles around a vegetation barrier  
are made. Effect of a vegetation barrier on alleviating the movement  
of particles is studied. Traffic-produced nanoparticles for roadside  
pedestrian exposure are investigated. Vegetation barrier found to  
reduce PNCs by ∼37% during the cross-road winds. Presence of  
vegetation barrier reduced the respiratory deposited doses by ∼36%.

Atmospheric Environment 90, June 2014, 113–124 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231014002258)

8) Limited effect of urban tree vegetation on NO2 and O3  
concentrations near a traffic route

Maria Grundström, Håkan Pleijel

NO2 was reduced by 7% inside an urban forest stand compared to  
outside. The magnitude of the effect was not related to autumn  
senescence. For O3 the effect was smaller and non-significant.

Environmental Pollution 189, June 2014, 73–76 - read article  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749114000773)

- o -

9) Effects of prenatal community violence and ambient air pollution on  
childhood wheeze in an urban population

Yueh-Hsiu Mathilda Chiu, Brent A. Coull, Michelle J. Sternthal, Itai  
Kloog, Joel Schwartz, Sheldon Cohen, Rosalind J. Wright

These findings suggest that both prenatal community violence and air  
pollution can contribute to respiratory health in these urban  
children. Moreover, place-based psychosocial stressors might affect  
host resistance such that physical pollutants can have adverse  
effects, even at relatively lower levels.

Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology 133;3 713–722.e4, March  
2014 - read abstract  
(http://www.jacionline.org/article/S0091-6749(13)01469-3/abstract)

- o -

10) Decline of ambient air pollution levels due to measures to control  
automobile emissions and effects on the prevalence of respiratory and  
allergic disorders among children in Japan

Hideki Hasunuma, Yasushi Ishimaru, Yoshiko Yoda, Masayuki Shima

Measures to control automobile emissions improved the air quality in  
Japan. We evaluated the effects of improved air quality on children׳s  
health. The prevalence of asthma decreased in areas with lower levels  
of air pollution. Enforcement of emissions controls may decrease the  
prevalence of asthma.

Environmental Research 131, May 2014, 111–118 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935114000528)

- o -

11) Airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) and the prevalence of allergic  
conjunctivitis in Japan

Tatsuya Mimura, Takamichi Ichinose, Satoru Yamagami, Hiroshi  
Fujishima, Yuko Kamei, Mari Goto, Sachiko Takada, Masao Matsubara

We examined the association of PM2.5 with allergic conjunctivitis. The  
number of outpatient associated with the PM2.5 level. PM2.5 was a  
significant predictor of the number of outpatient visits. PM2.5 may  
have a pathological role in the development of allergic conjunctivitis.

Science of The Total Environment 487, 15 July 2014, 493–499 - read  
abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969714005671)

- o -

12) Effects of ambient levels of traffic-derived air pollution on the  
ocular surface: Analysis of symptoms, conjunctival goblet cell count  
and mucin 5AC gene expression

André Augusto Miranda Torricelli, Monique Matsuda, Priscila Novaes,  
Alfésio Luiz Ferreira Braga, Paulo Hilário Nascimento Saldiva, Milton  
Ruiz Alves, Mário Luiz Ribeiro Monteiro

Ocular surface abnormalities occur in response to NO2 and PM exposure.  
Ambient air pollution alters goblet-cell density in ocular  
conjunctival epithelium. Muc5AC expression acts as an adaptive  
response of the ocular surface.

Environmental Research 131, May 2014, 59–63 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935114000413)

- o -

13) Association of short-term increases in ambient air pollution and  
timing of initial asthma diagnosis among medicaid-enrolled children in  
a metropolitan area

Judy K. Wendt, Elaine Symanski, Thomas H. Stock, Wenyaw Chan, Xianglin L. Du

Short-term air pollution exposure is associated with asthma symptoms  
in children. Whether these exposures impact the timing of initial  
asthma diagnosis is unknown. Asthma diagnosis was more likely after  
periods of higher air pollution exposure. Acute air pollution exposure  
may be a proximal trigger of initial asthma symptoms.

Environmental Research 131, May 2014, 50–58 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935114000401)

- o -

14) Air pollution and limb defects: A matched-pairs case-control study  
in Taiwan

Yu-Ting Lin, Yungling Leo Lee, Chau-Ren Jung, Jouni J.K. Jaakkola,  
Bing-Fang Hwang

We assessed the association between air pollution and specific limb  
defects in Taiwan. We focused on the first three months exposure in  
which limb formation is occurring in the fetus. Pregnant women  
exposure to SO2 and O3 may associate with the risk of limb defects  
among preterm births.

Environmental Research 132, July 2014, 273–280 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935114001200)

- o -

15) Associations between prenatal exposure to air pollution, small for  
gestational age, and term low birthweight in a state-wide birth cohort

Lisa C. Vinikoor-Imler, J. Allen Davis, Robert E. Meyer, Lynne C.  
Messer, Thomas J. Luben

We examined all births in North Carolina occurring between 2003 and  
2005. O3 concentrations during the third trimester were associated  
with small for gestational age and with term low birthweight. PM2.5  
concentrations had null or slightly inverse associations with small  
for gestational age and term low birthweight.

Environmental Research 132, July 2014,  132–139 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935114000875)

- o -

16) Road traffic noise, sleep and mental health

Karin Sygna, Gunn Marit Aasvang, Geir Aamodt, Bente Oftedal, Norun  
Hjertager Krog

We examined the relationship between road traffic noise and  
psychological distress. We also tested if sleep quality modifies the  
noise–mental health relationship. There was a weak positive  
association between noise and psychological distress. This association  
was only found among people with poor sleep quality.

Environmental Research 131, May 2014, 17–24 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935114000371)

- o -

17) Updated exposure-response relationship between road traffic noise  
and coronary heart diseases: A meta-analysis

Wolfgang Babisch

A meta-analysis of 14 studies (17 individual effect estimates) on the  
association between road traffic noise and coronary heart diseases was  
carried out. A significant pooled estimate of the relative risk of  
1.08 (95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.13) per increase of the  
weighted day-night noise level L DN of 10 dB (A) was found within the  
range of approximately 52-77 dB (A) (5 dB-category midpoints). The  
results gave no statistically significant indication of heterogeneity  
between the results of individual studies. However, stratified  
analyses showed that the treatment of gender in the studies, the  
lowest age of study subjects and the lowest cut-off of noise levels  
had an impact on the effect estimates of different studies. The result  
of the meta-analysis complies quantitatively with the result of a  
recent meta-analysis on the association between road traffic noise and  
hypertension. Road traffic noise is a significant risk factor for  
cardiovascular diseases.

Noise Health 2014;16:1-9 - read article  
(http://www.noiseandhealth.org/article.asp?issn=1463-1741;year=2014;volume=16;issue=68;spage=1;epage=9;aulast=Babisch)

- o -

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Compiler and Editor: Barbara Rimmington, Researcher, East End Quality
of Life Initiative

10 Montgomery Terrace Road

Sheffield S6 3BU

Tel. 0114 285 9931

Fax 0114 278 7173

Email: barbara at sheffieldct.co.uk

Web: www.sheffieldeastend.org.uk

Follow us/like us on facebook
http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/East-End-Quality-of-Life-Initiative/267727273318601

Join our Yahoo Group http://uk.groups.yahoo.com/group/eeqol/?yguid=292875649

LGC & HSJ Sustainable Communities -

Winner of Community Project Award 2007

Beacon Partner 2007-2008 Delivering Cleaner Air





More information about the news mailing list