[cleanairuk_news] Health Effects of Air Quality and Noise - update June 2017

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Mon Jun 19 18:18:02 BST 2017


* Health Effects of Air Quality and Noise - update June 2017 *

By Barbara Rimmington, Researcher, East End Quality of Life Initiative

(Previous edition - May 2017:  
http://cleanairuk.org/pipermail/news_cleanairuk.org/2017-June/000113.html)

(Index for previous issues:  
http://www.cleanairuk.org/health-air-pollution.html)

*CONTENTS*

1) The role of traffic noise on the association between air pollution  
and children's lung function

2) Traffic noise and hypertension – results from a large case-control study

3) Environmental Noise Pollution in the United States: Developing an  
Effective Public Health Response

4) Editorial - Air pollution—a wicked problem

5) Feature - London mayor, Sadiq Khan: how cities can act on air pollution

6) Analysis - Air pollution in the UK: better ways to solve the problem

7) Prenatal ambient air pollution exposure, infant growth and  
placental mitochondrial DNA content in the INMA birth cohort

8) Ambient air pollution and low birth weight - are some women more  
vulnerable than others?

9) Effects of Prenatal PM10 Exposure on Fetal Cardiovascular  
Malformations in Fuzhou, China: A Retrospective Case-Control Study

10) Health Impact of Outdoor Air Pollution in China: Current Knowledge  
and Future Research Needs

11) Cognitive impacts of ambient air pollution in the National Social  
Health and Aging Project (NSHAP) cohort

12) The short-term effect of particulate matter on cardiorespiratory  
drug prescription, as a proxy of mild adverse events

13) Genome-wide Association Study of Susceptibility to Particulate  
Matter–Associated QT Prolongation

14) Long-term exposure to residential ambient fine and coarse  
particulate matter and incident hypertension in post-menopausal women

15) Exposure to ambient PM2.5 associated with overall and  
domain-specific disability among adults in six low- and middle-income  
countries

16) The association between air pollution and type 2 diabetes in a  
large cross-sectional study in Leicester: The CHAMPIONS Study

17) Mechanistic Link between Diesel Exhaust Particles and Respiratory Reflexes

18) The association between ambient inhalable particulate matter and  
the disease burden of respiratory disease: An ecological study based  
on ten-year time series data in Tianjin, China

19) PM2.5-induced alterations of cell cycle associated gene expression  
in lung cancer cells and rat lung tissues

20) Air pollution abatement performances of green infrastructure in  
open road and built-up street canyon environments – A review

21) Incorporating wind availability into land use regression modelling  
of air quality in mountainous high-density urban environment

22)  A comparison of individual exposure, perception, and acceptable  
levels of PM2.5 with air pollution policy objectives in China

23) Degradation of natural habitats by roads: Comparing land-take and  
noise effect zone

- o -

1) The role of traffic noise on the association between air pollution  
and children's lung function

Meredith Franklin, , Scott Fruin

The joint effects of traffic noise and air pollution exposure on  
health are examined. Noise enhances the detrimental impact of air  
pollution on children's lung function. Noise is an important exposure  
to include in studies of traffic-related health outcomes.

Environmental Research 157, August 2017, 153–159 - read abstract  
(https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2017.05.024)

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2) Traffic noise and hypertension – results from a large case-control study

Hajo Zeeb, Janice Hegewald, Melanie Schubert, Mandy Wagner, Patrik  
Dröge, Enno Swart, Andreas Seidler

Traffic noise is a potentially important environmental cause of  
hypertension. This is the largest case-control study of hypertension  
and traffic noise exposure so far. There was no association between  
uncomplicated hypertension and individual residential noise exposure.  
We found an association between hypertension followed by heart disease  
and exposure to aircraft-, road- and railway noise.

Environmental Research 157, August 2017, 110–117 - read abstract  
(https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2017.05.019)

- o -

3) Environmental Noise Pollution in the United States: Developing an  
Effective Public Health Response

Monica S. Hammer, Tracy K. Swinburn, Richard L. Neitzel

Significant public health benefit can be achieved by integrating  
interventions that reduce environmental noise levels and exposures  
into the federal public health agenda.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/ehp.1307272 - read article  
(https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/1307272/)

- o -

4) Editorial - Air pollution—a wicked problem

S Holgate

BMJ 2017;357:j2814 - read editorial  
(http://www.bmj.com/content/357/bmj.j2814?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign_name=201706167&utm_source=etoc_weekly)

- o -

5) Feature - London mayor, Sadiq Khan: how cities can act on air pollution

Sadiq Khan, talks to Fiona Godlee, The BMJ’s editor in chief, about  
why air pollution is a key policy objective for his administration

BMJ 2017;357:j2842 - read article  
(http://www.bmj.com/content/357/bmj.j2842?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign_name=201706167&utm_source=etoc_weekly)

- o -

6) Analysis - Air pollution in the UK: better ways to solve the problem

The major health effects of air pollution can be reduced by tougher  
action on motor vehicles, argues Robin Russell-Jones

BMJ 2017;357:j2713 - read article  
(http://www.bmj.com/content/357/bmj.j2713?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign_name=201706167&utm_source=etoc_weekly)

- o -

7) Prenatal ambient air pollution exposure, infant growth and  
placental mitochondrial DNA content in the INMA birth cohort

Diana B.P. Clemente, Maribel Casas, Bram G. Janssen, Aitana Lertxundi,  
Loreto Santa-Marina, Carmen Iñiguez, Sabrina Llop, Jordi Sunyer,  
Mònica Guxens

Prenatal NO2 exposure was inversely associated with infant growth.  
Birth outcomes mediate the prenatal NO2 exposure and infant growth  
association. Placental mtDNA content was positively associated with  
infant length. Placental mtDNA mediates the prenatal NO2 exposure and  
infant length association.

Environmental Research 157, August 2017, 96–102 - read abstract  
(https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2017.05.018)

- o -

8) Ambient air pollution and low birth weight - are some women more  
vulnerable than others?

Nadja Westergaard, Ulrike Gehring, Rémy Slama, Marie Pedersen

Ambient air pollution increases the risk of intrauterine growth  
restriction (IUGR). Smokers and women of under/overweight or low SES  
may be more vulnerable. Further studies are recommended as the  
epidemiological evidence is limited.

Environment International 104, July 2017, 146–154 - read abstract  
(https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2017.03.026)

- o -

9) Effects of Prenatal PM10 Exposure on Fetal Cardiovascular  
Malformations in Fuzhou, China: A Retrospective Case-Control Study

Chao-Bin Liu, Xin-Ru Hong, Miao Shi, Xiao-Qiu Chen, Hui-Juan Huang,  
Jin-Hua Chen, Kai Yang, Su-Qing Chen, Han-Qiang Chen, Hai-Dong Kan,  
Qing-Hua Sun

Our findings suggest some positive associations between maternal  
exposure to ambient PM10 during the first two months of pregnancy and  
fetal cardiovascular malformations.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/EHP289 - read article  
(https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP289)

- o -

10) Health Impact of Outdoor Air Pollution in China: Current Knowledge  
and Future Research Needs

Haidong Kan, Bingheng Chen, and Chuanjie Hong

Outdoor air pollution is one of China’s most serious environmental problems.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/ehp.12737 - read article  
(https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/12737/)

- o -

11) Cognitive impacts of ambient air pollution in the National Social  
Health and Aging Project (NSHAP) cohort

Lindsay A. Tallon, Justin Manjourides, Vivian C. Pun, Carmel Salhi, Helen Suh

Associations between air pollutant exposures and cognitive outcomes  
were assessed. Increases in PM2.5 and NO2 exposures were associated  
with lower cognitive scores. Impacts of PM2.5 on cognition were  
modified by stroke, anxiety, and stress. Depression mediated the  
impacts of PM2.5 on cognition, and the effect of NO2 on CCFM is  
mediated by stress. Mediation results suggest new pathways through  
which PM2.5 and NO2 may impact cognition.

Environment International 104, July 2017, 102–109 - read abstract  
(https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2017.03.019)

- o -

12) The short-term effect of particulate matter on cardiorespiratory  
drug prescription, as a proxy of mild adverse events

Sara Conti, Alessandra Lafranconi, Antonella Zanobetti, Giancarlo  
Cesana, Fabiana Madotto, Carla Fornari

Cardiorespiratory prescriptions are stored in administrative  
databases. Such prescriptions can be used as tracers of mild disease  
episodes. We studied the relationship between PM10 and such  
prescriptions outside urban areas. PM10 is associated with a  
short-term increase in cardiorespiratory drugs consumption.

Environmental Research 157, August 2017, 145–152 - read abstract  
(https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2017.05.029)

- o -

13) Genome-wide Association Study of Susceptibility to Particulate  
Matter–Associated QT Prolongation

Rahul Gondalia, Christy L. Avery, Melanie D. Napier, Raúl  
Méndez-Giráldez, James D. Stewart, Colleen M. Sitlani, Yun Li, Kirk C.  
Wilhelmsen, Qing Duan, Jeffrey Roach, Kari E. North, Alexander P.  
Reiner, Zhu-Ming Zhang, Lesley F. Tinker, Jeff D. Yanosky, Duanping  
Liao, Eric A. Whitsel

The findings suggest that biologically plausible genetic factors may  
alter susceptibility to PM10-associated QT prolongation in populations  
protected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National  
Ambient Air Quality Standards. Independent replication and functional  
characterization are necessary to validate our findings.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/EHP347 - read article  
(https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/ehp347/)

- o -

14) Long-term exposure to residential ambient fine and coarse  
particulate matter and incident hypertension in post-menopausal women

Trenton Honda, Melissa N. Eliot, Charles B. Eaton, Eric Whitsel, James  
D. Stewart, Lina Mu, Helen Suh, Adam Szpiro, Joel D. Kaufman, Sverre  
Vedal, Gregory A. Wellenius

Long-term air pollution exposures were associated with higher  
incidence rates of hypertension in post-menopausal women. Associations  
between PM2.5 and hypertension were stronger among non-white  
participants and those living in the Northeast. These results suggest  
that particulate matter may be an important modifiable risk factor for  
hypertension.

Environment International 105, August 2017, 79–85 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412017303860)

- o -

15) Exposure to ambient PM2.5 associated with overall and  
domain-specific disability among adults in six low- and middle-income  
countries

Hualiang Lin, Yanfei Guo, Yang Zheng, Xing Zhao, Zheng Cao, Steven E.  
Rigdon, Hong Xian, Xing Li, Tao Liu, Jianpeng Xiao, Weilin Zeng, Nancy  
L. Weaver, ZhengminMin Qian

We examined the effects of PM2.5 on disability in adults. WHODAS was  
used to measure the disability. PM2.5 was found to be associated with  
overall disability. PM2.5 was also associated with cognition, mobility  
and getting along.

Environment International 104, July 2017, 69–75 - read abstract  
(https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2017.04.004)

- o -

16) The association between air pollution and type 2 diabetes in a  
large cross-sectional study in Leicester: The CHAMPIONS Study

Gary O'Donovan, Yogini Chudasama, Samuel Grocock, Roland Leigh, Alice  
M. Dalton, Laura J. Gray, Thomas Yates, Charlotte Edwardson, Sian  
Hill, Joe Henson, David Webb, Kamlesh Khunti

This is one of the largest cross-sectional studies of air pollution  
and diabetes. Air pollution was positively associated with type 2  
diabetes. Demographic factors explained away the association.

Environment International 104, July 2017, 41–47 - read abstract  
(https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2017.03.027)

- o -

17) Mechanistic Link between Diesel Exhaust Particles and Respiratory Reflexes

Ryan K. Robinson, Mark A. Birrell, John J. Adcock, Michael A.

Wortley, Eric D. Dubuis, Shu Chen, Catriona M. McGilvery, Sheng Hu,  
Milo SP. Shaffer, Sara J. Bonvini, Sarah A. Maher, Ian S. Mudway,  
Alexandra E. Porter, Chris Carlsten, Teresa D. Tetley, Maria G. Belvisi

This study provides the first mechanistic insights into how exposure  
to urban air pollution leads to activation of guinea-pig and human  
sensory nerves which are responsible for respiratory symptoms.  
Mechanistic information will enable the development of appropriate  
therapeutic interventions and mitigation strategies for those  
susceptible individuals who are most at risk.

Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology April 2017 - read article  
(http://www.jacionline.org/article/S0091-6749(17)30796-0/pdf)

- o -

18) The association between ambient inhalable particulate matter and  
the disease burden of respiratory disease: An ecological study based  
on ten-year time series data in Tianjin, China

Qiang Zeng, Ziting Wu, Guohong Jiang, Xiaoyin Wu, Pei Li, Yang Ni,  
Xiuqin Xiong, Xinyan Wang, Parasat, Guoxing Li, Xiaochuan Pan

YLL was adopted as the health endpoint to assess PM10-related health  
effects. A ten-year time-series study was conducted to assess the  
effects of PM10 on respiratory disease. PM10 was significantly  
associated with daily YLL of respiratory disease. The associations  
were stronger in the elderly and females than in younger residents and  
males. This study provides new epidemiological evidence for a  
PM-respiratory disease relationship.

Environmental Research 157, August 2017, 71–77 - read abstract  
(https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2017.05.004)

- o -

19) PM2.5-induced alterations of cell cycle associated gene expression  
in lung cancer cells and rat lung tissues

Hui Zhao, Biao Yang, Jia Xu, Dong-mei Chen, Chun-ling Xiao

Our study explored and characterized the expressions of cell  
cycle-associated genes induced by urban PM2.5 in H292 and rat lung  
tissues. The expressions of p53 and CDK2 play a crucial role in the  
early phase of exposure. Cdc2 and cyclin B expressions are important  
in mid-term, while the expression of p21 was predominant in long-term  
exposure. The degree of PM2.5-induced damage to trachea and lung  
tissue was time-dependent.

Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology 52, June 2017, 77–82 - read  
article (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.etap.2017.03.014)

- o -

20) Air pollution abatement performances of green infrastructure in  
open road and built-up street canyon environments – A review

K.V. Abhijith, Prashant Kumar, John Gallagher, Aonghus McNabola,  
Richard Baldauf, Francesco Pilla, Brian Broderick, Silvana Di  
Sabatino, Beatrice Pulvirenti

Green infrastructure can play a significant role in mitigating urban  
air pollution. Air quality changes in local built environments due to  
vegetation are assessed. Low-level hedges improves air quality in  
street canyons unlike high-level trees. Green green walls and roofs  
are effective to reduce pollution in streets/open roads. Prior design  
of green infrastructure should be performed for improving air quality.

Atmospheric Environment 162, August 2017, 71–86 - read abstract  
(https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2017.05.014)

- o -

21) Incorporating wind availability into land use regression modelling  
of air quality in mountainous high-density urban environment

Yuan Shi, Kevin Ka-Lun Lau, Edward Ng

LUR application in the mountainous high-density urban scenario. Wind  
environment were quantified by using the surface geomorphometrical  
analysis. Wind availability information was incorporated into LUR  
modelling. Wind variables show in most resultant models as significant  
independent variables. A maximum increase of 20% is achieved in the  
annual averaged NO2 model performance.

Environmental Research 157, August 2017, 17–29 - read abstract  
(https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2017.05.007)

- o -

22)  A comparison of individual exposure, perception, and acceptable  
levels of PM2.5 with air pollution policy objectives in China

Lei Huang, Chao Rao, Tsering Jan van der Kuijp, Jun Bi, Yang Liu

Public perception of Effect and Familiarity were significantly higher  
in the winter than in the summer. The correlation significances  
between ADD and each public perception factors existed diversity.  
Sensitive and vulnerable subpopulations to air pollution are  
discovered. SHE and HEDTH were key factors influencing public  
willingness to respond to haze. There remains a gap between PARL of  
air pollution and the policy objectives of the Action Plan.

Environmental Research 157, August 2017, 78–86 - read abstract  
(https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2017.05.012)

- o -

23) Degradation of natural habitats by roads: Comparing land-take and  
noise effect zone

Hossein Madadia, Hossein Moradi, Alireza Soffianian, Abdolrassoul  
Salmanmahiny, Josef Senn, Davide Geneletti

We conclude that, although the roads are breaking apart the patches by  
land-take, road noise not only dissects habitat patches but takes much  
larger proportions of or even functionally eliminates entire patches.

Environmental Impact Assessment Review 65, July 2017, 147–155 - read  
abstract (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eiar.2017.05.003)

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----------------------------------------------------------

Compiler and Editor: Barbara Rimmington, Researcher, East End Quality  
of Life Initiative

10 Montgomery Terrace Road

Sheffield S6 3BU

Tel. 0114 285 9931

Fax 0114 278 7173

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