[cleanairuk_news] Health Effects of Air Quality and Noise - update November 2016

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Sun Nov 20 13:15:00 GMT 2016


* Health Effects of Air Quality and Noise - update November 2016 *

By Barbara Rimmington, Researcher, East End Quality of Life Initiative

(Previous edition - October 2016:
http://cleanairuk.org/pipermail/news_cleanairuk.org/2016-November/000105.html)

(Index for previous issues:
http://www.cleanairuk.org/health-air-pollution.html)

*CONTENTS*

1) Residential road traffic noise exposure and survival after breast  
cancer – A cohort study

2) Road traffic noise, blood pressure and heart rate: Pooled analyses  
of harmonized data from 88,336 participants

3) Car free cities: Pathway to healthy urban living

4) Exposures to Particulate Matter from the Eruptions of the Puyehue  
Volcano and Birth Outcomes in Montevideo, Uruguay

5) Association between ambient air pollution and proliferation of  
umbilical cord blood cells

6) Urinary t,t-muconic acid as a proxy-biomarker of car exhaust and  
neurobehavioral performance in 15-year olds

7) Air pollution, ethnicity and telomere length in east London  
schoolchildren: An observational study

8) Mortality burden of ambient fine particulate air pollution in six  
Chinese cities: Results from the Pearl River Delta study

9) Particulate Air Pollution, Exceptional Aging, and Rates of  
Centenarians: A Nationwide Analysis of the United States, 1980–2010

10) Environmental risk factors for dementia: a systematic review

11) Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) association with peripheral artery  
disease admissions in northeastern United States

12) Particulate Matter and Subclinical Atherosclerosis: Associations  
between Different Particle Sizes and Sources with Carotid Intima-Media  
Thickness in the SAPALDIA Study

13) Exposure to Fine Particulate Air Pollution Is Associated with  
Endothelial Injury and Systemic Inflammation

14) Does chronic exposure to high levels of nitrogen dioxide  
exacerbate the short-term effects of airborne particles?

15) Particulate Air Pollution and Fasting Blood Glucose in Nondiabetic  
Individuals: Associations and Epigenetic Mediation in the Normative  
Aging Study, 2000–2011

16) Does environmental exposure to the greenhouse gas, N2O, contribute  
to etiological factors in neurodevelopmental disorders? A mini-review  
of the evidence

17) Spatial variation in nitrogen dioxide concentrations and  
cardiopulmonary hospital admissions

18) Traffic-related air pollution increased the risk of Parkinson's  
disease in Taiwan: A nationwide study

19) Ambient Air Pollution Exposures and Risk of Parkinson Disease

20) Gene-environment interactions linking air pollution and  
inflammation in Parkinson's disease

21) Panel studies of air pollution in patients with COPD: Systematic  
review and meta-analysis

22) Mortality and morbidity due to exposure to outdoor air pollution  
in Mashhad metropolis, Iran. The AirQ model approach

23) Effects of Ambient Air Pollution Exposure on Olfaction: A Review

24) Fine particulate matter exposure and olfactory dysfunction among  
urban-dwelling older US adults

25) Using spatio-temporal modeling for exposure assessment in an  
investigation of fine particulate air pollution and cardiovascular  
mortality

26) Assessing the impact of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) on  
respiratory-cardiovascular chronic diseases in the New York City  
Metropolitan area using Hierarchical Bayesian Model estimates

27) Twin problems of climate change and air pollution

- o -

1) Residential road traffic noise exposure and survival after breast  
cancer – A cohort study

Nina Roswall, Pernille Envold Bidstrup, Ole Raaschou-Nielsen, Steen  
Solvang Jensen, Anja Olsen, Mette Sørensen

Traffic noise is increasingly being related to disease incidence and  
prognosis. No previous study has examined traffic noise in relation to  
breast cancer prognosis. We examined the association in a cohort of  
1,759 women with breast cancer. The study found no association between  
road traffic noise and mortality. As the study had relatively limited  
power, further studies are warranted.

Environmental Research 151, November 2016, 814–820 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116304327)

- o -

2) Road traffic noise, blood pressure and heart rate: Pooled analyses  
of harmonized data from 88,336 participants

Wilma Zijlema, Yutong Cai, Dany Doiron, Stéphane Mbatchou, Isabel  
Fortier, John Gulliver, Kees de Hoogh, David Morley, Susan Hodgson,

Paul Elliott, Timothy Key, Havard Kongsgard, Kristian Hveem, Amadou  
Gaye, Paul Burton, Anna Hansell, Ronald Stolk, Judith Rosmalen
Road traffic noise may be related to increased heart rate. We found no  
consistent evidence for a relation between noise and blood pressure.  
Co-exposure to air pollution should be taken into account in noise  
studies.

Environmental Research 151, November 2016, 804–813 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116306119)

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3) Car free cities: Pathway to healthy urban living

Mark J. Nieuwenhuijsen, Haneen Khreis

Hamburg and Oslo recently announced their plans to become (partly)  
private car free. This is likely to reduce greenhouse gases, air  
pollution, noise, and temperature. This can provide opportunities to  
increase green space and social interactions. This is likely to lead  
to higher levels of active transport and physical activity. All of  
which are likely to improve public health.

Environment International 94, September 2016, 251–262 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016302161)

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4) Exposures to Particulate Matter from the Eruptions of the Puyehue  
Volcano and Birth Outcomes in Montevideo, Uruguay

Ana Ines Balsa, Marcelo Caffera, Juanita Bloomfield

Taking advantage of a natural experiment, we found evidence that  
exposure to high levels of PM10 during the third trimester of  
pregnancy may have increased preterm births among women in Montevideo,  
Uruguay.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/EHP235 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/EHP235/)

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5) Association between ambient air pollution and proliferation of  
umbilical cord blood cells

L. Novack, M. Yitshak-Sade, D. Landau, I. Kloog, B. Sarov, I. Karakis

Ambient air pollutants were suggested to have an impact on cell  
proliferation (CP) of umbilical cord blood. Ozone (O3) and carbon  
monoxide (CO) levels days before delivery were associated with lower  
CP. Particulate matter day before delivery was associated with  
increased CP levels; CP levels decreased for pollutants' levels more  
distant in time. Change in directions of an association is likely to  
be related to different underlying pathophysiological mechanism of  
pollutants' effect on humans' body.

Environmental Research 151, November 2016, 783–788 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116305898)

- o -

6) Urinary t,t-muconic acid as a proxy-biomarker of car exhaust and  
neurobehavioral performance in 15-year olds

Michal Kicinski, Nelly D. Saenen, Mineke K. Viaene, Elly Den Hond,  
Greet Schoeters, Michelle Plusquin, Vera Nelen, Liesbeth Bruckers,  
Isabelle Sioen, Ilse Loots, Willy Baeyens, Harry A. Roels, Tim S. Nawrot

Urinary trans, trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA-U) as proxy-biomarker of  
traffic exposure. We explored effect-sizes between t,t-MA-U and  
neurobehavioral tests in adolescents. t,t-MA-U was associated with  
significant attention and short-term memory deficits. Neurobehavioral  
test effect-sizes amount to 40% of parental education effect-size.

Environmental Research 151, November 2016, 521–527 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116302705)

- o -

7) Air pollution, ethnicity and telomere length in east London  
schoolchildren: An observational study

Robert T. Walton, Ian S. Mudway, Isobel Dundas, Nadine Marlin, Lee C.  
Koh, Layla Aitlhadj, Tom Vulliamy, Jeenath B. Jamaludin, Helen E.  
Wood, Ben M. Barratt, Sean Beevers, David Dajnak, Aziz Sheikh, Frank  
J. Kelly, Chris J. Griffiths, Jonathan Grigg

This is the first study on air pollution and telomere length in  
children. Genetic ancestry is a major determinant of telomere length  
in children. Continuous exposure to pollution is associated with  
telomere elongation. Future research should investigate longitudinal  
effects on telomeres.

Environment International 96, November 2016, 41–47 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016303191)

- o -

8) Mortality burden of ambient fine particulate air pollution in six  
Chinese cities: Results from the Pearl River Delta study

Hualiang Lin, Tao Liu, Jianpeng Xiao, Weilin Zeng, Xing Li, Lingchuan  
Guo, Yonghui Zhang, Yanjun Xu, Jun Tao, Hong Xian, Kevin M. Syberg,  
Zhengmin (Min) Qian, Wenjun Ma

We observed a significant association between PM2.5 and mortality. A  
10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 corresponded to 1.76% all cause mortality  
increase. About 3.79% of all-cause mortalities were attributable to  
PM2.5.

Environment International 96, November 2016, 91–97 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016303683)

- o-

9) Particulate Air Pollution, Exceptional Aging, and Rates of  
Centenarians: A Nationwide Analysis of the United States, 1980–2010

Andrea A. Baccarelli, Nick Hales, Richard T. Burnett, Michael Jerrett,  
Carter Mix, Douglas W. Dockery, C. Arden Pope III

Communities with the most exceptional aging have low ambient air  
pollution and low rates of smoking, poverty, and obesity. Improvements  
in these determinants may contribute to increasing exceptional aging.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/EHP197 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/EHP197/)

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10) Environmental risk factors for dementia: a systematic review

Lewis O. J. Killin, John M. Starr, Ivy J. Shiue, Tom C. Russ

There is at least moderate evidence consistently supporting air  
pollution, aluminium, silicon, selenium, pesticides, vitamin D, and  
electromagnetic fields as putative environmental risk factors for  
dementia. More and better research is needed and we suggest that this  
shortlist should form the initial focus of attention.
BMC Geriatrics 2016 16:175 - read article  
(https://bmcgeriatr.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12877-016-0342-y)

- o -

11) Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) association with peripheral artery  
disease admissions in northeastern United States

Itai Kloog

The study supports the hypothesis that acute and chronic exposure to  
PM2.5 can increase the risk of PAD.

Intern Journal of Environmental Health Research 26, 2016; 5-6 572-577  
- read abstract  
(http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09603123.2016.1217315)

- o -

12) Particulate Matter and Subclinical Atherosclerosis: Associations  
between Different Particle Sizes and Sources with Carotid Intima-Media  
Thickness in the SAPALDIA Study

Inmaculada Aguilera, Julia Dratva, Seraina Caviezel, Luc Burdet, Eric  
de Groot, Regina E. Ducret-Stich, Marloes Eeftens, Dirk Keidel, Reto  
Meier, Laura Perez, Thomas Rothe, Emmanuel Schaffner, Arno  
Schmit-Trucksäss, Ming-Yi Tsai, Christian Schindler, Nino Künzli,  
Nicole Probst-Hensch

CIMT was associated with exposure to PM10, PM2.5, and UFP. The PM2.5  
source-specific analysis showed a positive association for the  
vehicular source but not for the crustal source. Although the effects  
of PNC and LDSA were similar in magnitude, two-pollutant and  
residual-based models suggested that LDSA may be a better marker for  
the health relevance of UFP.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/EHP161 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/EHP161/)

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13) Exposure to Fine Particulate Air Pollution Is Associated with  
Endothelial Injury and Systemic Inflammation

C A Pope, Aruni Bhatnagar, James McCracken, Wesley T Abplanalp, Daniel  
J Conklin, Timothy E O'Toole

Episodic PM2.5 exposures are associated with increased endothelial  
cell apoptosis, an anti-angiogenic plasma profile, and elevated levels  
of circulating monocytes, and T, but not B, lymphocytes. These changes  
could contribute to the pathogenic sequelae of atherogenesis and acute  
coronary events.

Circulation Research 2016;CIRCRESAHA.116.309279 - read article  
(http://circres.ahajournals.org/content/early/2016/10/19/CIRCRESAHA.116.309279)

- o -

14) Does chronic exposure to high levels of nitrogen dioxide  
exacerbate the short-term effects of airborne particles?

Annunziata Faustini, Massimo Stafoggia, Matteo Renzi, Giulia Cesaroni,  
Ester Alessandrini, Marina Davoli, Francesco Forastiere

Long-term exposure to NO2 is not likely to induce susceptibility to  
short-term PM10 exposure in the overall population. However, an effect  
modification of NO2 is probable in the elderly and in those suffering  
from arrhythmias and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Occup Environ Med 2016;73:772-778 - read abstract  
(http://oem.bmj.com/content/73/11/772.abstract?etoc)

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15) Particulate Air Pollution and Fasting Blood Glucose in Nondiabetic  
Individuals: Associations and Epigenetic Mediation in the Normative  
Aging Study, 2000–2011

Cheng Peng, Marie-Abele C. Bind, Elena Colicino, Itai Kloog, Hyang-Min  
Byun, Laura Cantone, Letizia Trevisi, Jia Zhong, Kasey Brennan,  
Alexandra E. Dereix, Pantel S. Vokonas, Brent A. Coull, Joel D.  
Schwartz, Andrea A. Baccarelli

Among nondiabetics, short- and medium-term PM2.5 were associated with  
higher FBG. Mediation analysis indicated that part of this association  
was mediated by ICAM-1 promoter methylation.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/EHP183 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/EHP183/)

- o -

16) Does environmental exposure to the greenhouse gas, N2O, contribute  
to etiological factors in neurodevelopmental disorders? A mini-review  
of the evidence

Keith Fluegge
The current evidence and subsequent hypotheses suggest that a renewed  
interest be taken in the toxicological assessment of environmental N2O  
exposure using validated biomarkers and psychiatric endpoints. Given  
the relevance of N2O as a greenhouse gas, societies may also wish to  
engage in a more robust monitoring and reporting of N2O levels in the  
environment for climactic benefit as well.

Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology 47, October 2016, 6–18 -  
read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1382668916302149)

- o -

17) Spatial variation in nitrogen dioxide concentrations and  
cardiopulmonary hospital admissions

Marieke B.A. Dijkema, Robert T. van Strien, Saskia C. van der Zee,  
Sanne F. Mallant, Paul Fischer, Gerard Hoek, Bert Brunekreef, Ulrike  
Gehring

Long-term exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was linked to hospital  
admissions. Hospital admissions registry data for the West of the  
Netherlands (4 Mio. inhabitants) were used. Risks of hospitalization  
for asthma and COPD were higher in areas with higher levels of NO2.

Environmental Research 151, November 2016, 721–727 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116305679)

- o -

18) Traffic-related air pollution increased the risk of Parkinson's  
disease in Taiwan: A nationwide study

Pei-Chen Lee, Li-Ling Liu, Yu Sun, Yu-An Chen, Chih-Ching Liu,  
Chung-Yi Li, Hwa-Lung Yu, Beate Ritz

Traffic-related pollutants NOx and CO increase the risk of PD. High  
levels of coarse particles contribute to the increased risk of PD.  
Traffic-related air pollution may adversely affect the aging brain.

Environment International 96, November 2016, 75–81 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016303075)

- o -

19) Ambient Air Pollution Exposures and Risk of Parkinson Disease

Rui Liu, Michael T. Young, Jiu-Chiuan Chen, Joel D. Kaufman, Honglei Chen

Overall, we found limited evidence for an association between  
exposures to ambient PM10, PM2.5, or NO2 and PD risk. The suggestive  
evidence that exposures to PM2.5 and PM10 may increase PD risk among  
female never smokers warrants further investigation.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/EHP135 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/EHP135/)

- o -

20) Gene-environment interactions linking air pollution and  
inflammation in Parkinson's disease

Pei-Chen Lee, Ole Raaschou-Nielsen, Christina M. Lill, Lars Bertram,  
Janet S. Sinsheimer, Johnni Hansen, Beate Ritz

Investigate the interactions between air pollution and variations in  
inflammation related genes on PD. Suggestive evidence for interactions  
between NO2 exposure and IL1B rs16944 on PD susceptibility. May  
provide first insights on the mechanisms underlying the association of  
air pollution with PD risk.

Environmental Research 151, November 2016, 713–720 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116305564)

- o -

21) Panel studies of air pollution in patients with COPD: Systematic  
review and meta-analysis

Lizan D. Bloemsma, Gerard Hoek, Lidwien A.M. Smit

Evidence from panel studies suggests acute effects of PM10 in COPD  
patients. An increase in PM10 is associated with an acute decrease of  
FEV1 in COPD patients. An increase in PM10 is associated with an acute  
decrease of PEF in COPD patients. There is suggestive evidence of an  
association between PM10 and symptoms.

Environmental Research 151, November 2016, 458–468 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116304182)

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22) Mortality and morbidity due to exposure to outdoor air pollution  
in Mashhad metropolis, Iran. The AirQ model approach

Mohammad Miri, Zahra Derakhshan, Ahmad Allahabadi, Ehsan Ahmadi, Gea  
Oliveri Conti, Margherita Ferrante, Hamideh Ebrahimi Aval

We assessed the air pollution impact on mortality in Mashad, Iran in  
2014–2015. The methodology developed by the WHO was used for this  
purpose. The effect of PM10, PM2.5, NO2, SO2 and O3 on human health  
has been evaluated. PM2.5 had the most health effects on Mashhad  
inhabitants.

Environmental Research 151, November 2016, 451–457 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116303267)

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23) Effects of Ambient Air Pollution Exposure on Olfaction: A Review

Gaurav S. Ajmani, Helen H. Suh, Jayant M. Pinto

Ambient air pollution may impact human olfactory function. Additional  
studies are needed to examine air pollution–related olfactory impacts  
on the general population using measured pollution exposures and to  
link pollution exposure with olfactory dysfunction and related  
pathology.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/EHP136 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/EHP136/)

- o -

24) Fine particulate matter exposure and olfactory dysfunction among  
urban-dwelling older US adults

Gaurav S. Ajmani, Helen H. Suh, Kristen E. Wroblewski, David W. Kern,  
L. Philip Schumm, Martha K. McClintock, Jeff D. Yanosky, Jayant M. Pinto

We show for the first time that air pollution exposure is associated  
with poor olfaction among urban-living, older US adults.

Environmental Research 151, November 2016, 797–803 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116305540)

- o -

25) Using spatio-temporal modeling for exposure assessment in an  
investigation of fine particulate air pollution and cardiovascular  
mortality

Arvind Dabass, Evelyn O. Talbott, Richard A. Bilonick, Judith R.  
Rager, Arvind Venkat, Gary M. Marsh, Chunzhe Duan, Tao Xue

A case-crossover study of PM2.5 and CVD mortality was conducted for  
1999–2011. We used spatio-temporal modeling to better estimate the  
exposure of air pollutants. Lag day 5 had increased risk for PM2.5 for  
IHD and PVD mortality. PM2.5 had the largest impact on IHD among the  
people who died at home. The association between PM2.5 and PVD was  
strongest among men and in cold season.

Environmental Research 151, November 2016, 564–572 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116304492)

- o -

26) Assessing the impact of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) on  
respiratory-cardiovascular chronic diseases in the New York City  
Metropolitan area using Hierarchical Bayesian Model estimates

Stephanie A. Weber, Tabassum Z. Insaf, Eric S. Hall, Thomas O. Talbot,  
Amy K. Huff

Satellite AOD fused with monitor and model data using Bayesian  
space-time model. Case-crossover analyses used to estimate impact of  
variations in PM2.5 on health effects. High PM2.5 exposure associated  
with increased risk of asthma, MI and heart failure. Satellite data  
did not significantly increase model performance in the study region.

Environmental Research 151, November 2016, 399–409 - read article  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116302961)

- o -

27) Twin problems of climate change and air pollution

Given that ambient air quality is recognised to be the second largest  
challenge to public health (smoking still leads the pack), it would be  
catastrophic if the wrong decisions were made again in trying to deal  
with climate change. Recognising the importance of these issues and  
the inextricable overlap between climate change and air quality, a  
report from the UK Health Alliance on Climate Change considers how  
integrated strategies could tackle both these challenges.

BMJ 2016; 355 - read editorial  
(http://www.bmj.com/content/355/bmj.i5620?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign_name=201610302&utm_source=etoc_weekly)

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----------------------------------------------------------

Compiler and Editor: Barbara Rimmington, Researcher, East End Quality
of Life Initiative

10 Montgomery Terrace Road

Sheffield S6 3BU

Tel. 0114 285 9931

Fax 0114 278 7173

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