[cleanairuk_news] Health Effects of Air Quality and Noise - update September 2016

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Fri Nov 11 13:31:11 GMT 2016


* Health Effects of Air Quality and Noise - update September 2016 *

By Barbara Rimmington, Researcher, East End Quality of Life Initiative

(Previous edition - August 2016:
http://cleanairuk.org/pipermail/news_cleanairuk.org/2016-November/000103.html)

(Index for previous issues:
http://www.cleanairuk.org/health-air-pollution.html)

*NOTICE*

Clean Air Convergence 2016, Saturday 12 November 2016 at Student  
Central (formerly Univeristy of London Union - ULU) Malet Street, London

Details: http://cleanairuk.org/convergence-2016.html

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*CONTENTS*

1) Testing of the European Union exposure-response relationships and  
annoyance equivalents model for annoyance due to transportation  
noises: The need of revised exposure-response relationships and  
annoyance equivalents model

2) Pregnancy and childhood exposure to residential traffic noise and  
overweight at 7 years of age

3) Noise sensitivity: Symptoms, health status, illness behavior and  
co-occurring environmental sensitivities

4) Cardiovascular and stress responses to short-term noise exposures—A  
panel study in healthy males

5) The short-term association of road traffic noise with  
cardiovascular, respiratory, and diabetes-related mortality

6) Long-Term Air Pollution and Traffic Noise Exposures and Mild  
Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of  
the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study

7) Children's well-being at schools: Impact of climatic conditions and  
air pollution

8) Exposure to outdoor air pollution during trimesters of pregnancy  
and childhood asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema

9) Exposure to ambient air pollution during pregnancy and preterm  
birth: A Spanish multicenter birth cohort study

10) Exposure to coarse particulate matter during gestation and birth  
weight in the U.S.

11) Particulate matter and early childhood body weight

12) Air pollution exposure, cause-specific deaths and hospitalizations  
in a highly polluted Italian region

13) Association between vehicular emissions and cardiorespiratory  
disease risk in Brazil and its variation by spatial clustering of  
socio-economic factors

14) Magnetite pollution nanoparticles in the human brain

15) Air pollution and diabetes association: Modification by type 2  
diabetes genetic risk score

16) Associations of oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers with  
chemically-characterized air pollutant exposures in an elderly cohort

17) Association of novel metrics of particulate matter with vascular  
markers of inflammation and coagulation in susceptible populations  
–results from a panel study

18) Respiratory medication sales and urban air pollution in Brussels  
(2005 to 2011)

19) Association between fine particulate matter chemical constituents  
and airway inflammation: A panel study among healthy adults in China

20) Environmental Research 150, October 2016, 264–268 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116302572)

21) Wastewater-based epidemiological evaluation of the effect of air  
pollution on short-acting beta-agonist consumption for acute asthma  
treatment

22) Effect of the shape of the exposure-response function on estimated  
hospital costs in a study on non-elective pneumonia hospitalizations  
related to particulate matter

23) Residential proximity to traffic and female pubertal development

24) DNA hypomethylation and its mediation in the effects of fine  
particulate air pollution on cardiovascular biomarkers: A randomized  
crossover trial

25) Association between air pollution and coronary artery  
calcification within six metropolitan areas in the USA (the  
Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution): a  
longitudinal cohort study

26) Personal exposure to fine particulate matter and blood pressure: A  
role of angiotensin converting enzyme and its DNA methylation

27) Long-Term Exposure to Particulate Matter and Self-Reported  
Hypertension: A Prospective Analysis in the Nurses’ Health Study

28) Ambient Fine Particulate Matter and Mortality among Survivors of  
Myocardial Infarction: Population-Based Cohort Study

29) Countervailing effects of income, air pollution, smoking, and  
obesity on aging and life expectancy: population-based study of U.S.  
Counties

30) Long-Term Exposure to Ambient Fine Particulate Matter and Renal  
Function in Older Men: The Veterans Administration Normative Aging Study

31) miRNA expression profiles and retinal blood vessel calibers are  
associated with short-term particulate matter air pollution exposure

32) Concentration dynamics of coarse and fine particulate matter at  
and around signalised traffic intersections

33) Temperature-related mortality estimates after accounting for the  
cumulative effects of air pollution in an urban area

34) Using Social Media to Detect Outdoor Air Pollution and Monitor Air  
Quality Index (AQI): A Geo-Targeted Spatiotemporal Analysis Framework  
with Sina Weibo (Chinese Twitter)

35) “Exposure Track”—The Impact of Mobile-Device-Based Mobility  
Patterns on Quantifying Population Exposure to Air Pollution

36) Car free cities: Pathway to healthy urban living

37) Short-term exposure to high ambient air pollution increases airway  
inflammation and respiratory symptoms in chronic obstructive pulmonary  
disease patients in Beijing, China

38) Air pollution exposure increases the risk of rheumatoid arthritis:  
A longitudinal and nationwide study

39) Assessment of estrogenic and androgenic activity in PM10 air  
samples from an urban, industrial and rural area in Flanders (Belgium)  
using the CALUX bioassay

40) State of the Air 2016 American Lung Foundation

41) Assessing concentrations and health impacts of air quality  
management strategies: Framework for Rapid Emissions Scenario and  
Health impact ESTimation (FRESH-EST)

42) Seasonal variation in outdoor, indoor, and personal air pollution  
exposures of women using wood stoves in the Tibetan Plateau: Baseline  
assessment for an energy intervention study

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1) Testing of the European Union exposure-response relationships and  
annoyance equivalents model for annoyance due to transportation  
noises: The need of revised exposure-response relationships and  
annoyance equivalents model

Laure-Anne Gille, Catherine Marquis-Favre, Julien Morel

New survey data dealing with annoyance due to transportation noises  
were collected. European Union exposure-response relationships were  
tested and new ones derived. Measured total annoyance was used to test  
the annoyance equivalents model. A new annoyance equivalents model was  
derived using new exposure-response relationships. A way to consider  
sensitivity in single and total noise annoyance model is proposed.

Environment International 94, September 2016, 83–94 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016301568)

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2) Pregnancy and childhood exposure to residential traffic noise and  
overweight at 7 years of age

Jeppe Schultz Christensen, Dorrit Hjortebjerg, Ole Raaschou-Nielsen,  
Matthias Ketzel, Thorkild I.A. Sørensen, Mette Sørensen

Traffic noise has been associated with overweight in adults. This  
study examines the association in children. Exposure to traffic noise  
is modeled for pregnancy and childhood. There are indications of  
increased risk of overweight with increased road traffic noise.

Environment International 94, September 2016,  170–176 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016301891)

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3) Noise sensitivity: Symptoms, health status, illness behavior and  
co-occurring environmental sensitivities

Christos Baliatsas, Irene van Kamp, Wim Swart, Mariëtte Hooiveld,  
Joris Yzermans

People with self-reported noise sensitivity experience multiple  
non-specific symptoms. They also report comparatively poorer health  
and increased illness behavior. Co-occurrence with other environmental  
sensitivities is moderate to high. Road-traffic noise and  
GP-registered morbidity did not account for these results.

Environmental Research 150, October 2016, 8–13 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116302018)

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4) Cardiovascular and stress responses to short-term noise exposures—A  
panel study in healthy males

Erica D. Walker, Anthony Brammer, Martin G. Cherniack, Francine Laden,  
Jennifer M. Cavallari

Cardiovascular and stress responses to low and high frequency noise  
exposures was investigated in a study of males (n=10). Reductions in  
heart rate variability (HRV) were observed during noise exposure.  
During low frequency noise exposure, the HRV parameters HF, LF, and  
SDNN were reduced. During high frequency noise exposure, the HRV  
parameter LF was reduced. No statistically significant changes in  
blood pressure, salivary cortisol, or amylase were observed.

Environmental Research 150, October 2016, 391–397 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S001393511630250X)

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5) The short-term association of road traffic noise with  
cardiovascular, respiratory, and diabetes-related mortality

Alberto Recio, Cristina Linares, José R. Banegas, Julio Díaz

Road traffic noise increases the risk of death from frequent diseases.  
Noise effects manifest the same day up to 2 days after the exposure.  
Most effects are independent of air pollution.

Environmental Research 150, October 2016, 383–390 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116302493)

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6) Long-Term Air Pollution and Traffic Noise Exposures and Mild  
Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of  
the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study

Lilian Tzivian, Martha Dlugaj, Angela Winkler, Gudrun Weinmayr, Frauke  
Hennig, Kateryna B. Fuks, Mohammad Vossoughi, Tamara Schikowski,  
Christian Weimar, Raimund Erbel, Karl-Heinz Jöckel, Susanne Moebus,  
Barbara Hoffmann, on behalf of the Heinz Nixdorf Recall study  
Investigative Group

Long-term exposures to air pollution and traffic noise were positively  
associated with MCI, mainly with the amnestic subtype.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/ehp.1509824 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/15-09824/)

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7) Children's well-being at schools: Impact of climatic conditions and  
air pollution

Tunga Salthammer, Erik Uhde, Tobias Schripp, Alexandra Schieweck,  
Lidia Morawska, Mandana Mazaheri, Sam Clifford, Congrong He, Giorgio  
Buonanno, Xavier Querol, Mar Viana, Prashant Kumar

Recent literature on the air quality in school environments is  
reviewed. Urbanization and climate change adversely affect the air  
quality in classrooms. Carbon dioxide is not the sole key parameter  
for ventilation control. Sources of gaseous pollutants and particulate  
matter in classrooms are discussed. Advanced IAQ guidelines are  
required to improve the performance in schoolwork.

Environment International 94, September 2016, 196–210 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016301829)

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8) Exposure to outdoor air pollution during trimesters of pregnancy  
and childhood asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema

Qihong Deng, Chan Lu, Yuguo Li, Jan Sundell, Dan Norbäck

The present study endorsed fetal origins of childhood allergic  
diseases. Exposure to air pollution during pregnancy was associated  
with childhood allergy. Traffic-related air pollutant (NO2) is related  
to the development of allergic diseases. Allergic diseases in children  
may be related to maternal exposure in specific trimester.

Environmental Research 150, October 2016, 119–127 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116302225)

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9) Exposure to ambient air pollution during pregnancy and preterm  
birth: A Spanish multicenter birth cohort study

Marisa Estarlich, Ferran Ballester, Payam Davdand, Sabrina Llop, Ana  
Esplugues, Ana Fernández-Somoano, Aitana Lertxundi, Mònica Guxens,  
Mikel Basterrechea, Adonina Tardón, Jordi Sunyer, Carmen Iñiguez

Relation between maternal air pollution exposure and preterm birth is  
assessed in Spain. Biggest cohort study examining benzene exposure and  
preterm birth conducted to date. Our results suggest an association  
between traffic-related air pollution and preterm birth.

Environmental Research 147, May 2016, 50–58 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116300354)

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10) Exposure to coarse particulate matter during gestation and birth  
weight in the U.S.

Keita Ebisu, Jesse D. Berman , Michelle L. Bell

Only a few studies have explored birth outcomes in association with  
PM10-2.5. We explored associations between PM10-2.5 gestational  
exposure and birth weight. PM10-2.5 is associated with birth weight in  
addition to PM2.5. Our findings indicate potentially important health  
effects of PM10-2.5.

Environment International 94, September 2016, 519–524 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S016041201630229X)

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11) Particulate matter and early childhood body weight

Eunjeong Kim, Hyesook Park, Eun Ae Park, Yun-Chul Hong, Mina Ha,  
Hwan-Cheol Kim, Eun-Hee Ha

Effects of particulate matter on children's growth were studied in a  
birth cohort study in South Korea. Prenatal and postnatal exposure of  
particulate matter were estimated. Perinatal exposure to particulate  
matter affects postnatal children's weight. Children's birth weight  
might impact on the vulnerability to air pollution regarding  
children's growth.

Environment International 94, September 2016, 591–599 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016302392?np=y)

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12) Air pollution exposure, cause-specific deaths and hospitalizations  
in a highly polluted Italian region

Michele Carugno, Dario Consonni, Giorgia Randi, Dolores Catelan, Laura  
Grisotto, Pier Alberto Bertazzi, Annibale Biggeri, Michela Baccini

All-cause and cause-specific mortality is associated with PM10 and NO2  
exposure. Cause-specific hospitalizations increase with increasing  
levels of air pollution. Air pollution effects on deaths and  
hospitalizations are more evident in the summer. The effect of PM10 on  
respiratory hospitalizations increases with age. Air pollution effects  
on cerebrovascular hospitalizations are greater before age 75.

Environmental Research 147, May 2016, 415–424 - read article  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116300834)

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13) Association between vehicular emissions and cardiorespiratory  
disease risk in Brazil and its variation by spatial clustering of  
socio-economic factors

Weeberb J. Requia, Petros Koutrakis, Henrique L. Roig, Matthew D.  
Adams, Cleide M. Santos

A 15% increase in air pollution is associated with a 6% increase in  
hospital admissions rates in Brazil. Our findings suggest that  
socio-economic factors are important modifiers of the human risk of  
cardiorespiratory disease due to exposure to vehicle emissions in  
Brazil. Results from the spatial cluster analysis revealed two groups  
of municipalities with distinct sets of socio-economic factors and  
risk levels of cardiorespiratory disease related to exposure to  
vehicular emissions.

Environmental Research 150, October 2016, 452–460 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116302614)

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14) Magnetite pollution nanoparticles in the human brain

Barbara A. Maher, Imad A. M. Ahmed, Vassil Karloukovski, Donald A.  
MacLaren, Penelope G. Foulds, David Allsop, David M. A. Mann, Ricardo  
Torres-Jardón, Lilian Calderon-Garciduenas

We identify the abundant presence in the human brain of magnetite  
nanoparticles that match precisely the high-temperature magnetite  
nanospheres, formed by combustion and/or friction-derived heating,  
which are prolific in urban, airborne particulate matter (PM). Because  
many of the airborne magnetite pollution particles are <200 nm in  
diameter, they can enter the brain directly through the olfactory  
nerve and by crossing the damaged olfactory unit. This discovery is  
important because nanoscale magnetite can respond to external magnetic  
fields, and is toxic to the brain, being implicated in production of  
damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS). Because enhanced ROS  
production is causally linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as  
Alzheimer’s disease, exposure to such airborne PM-derived magnetite  
nanoparticles might need to be examined as a possible hazard to human  
health.

PNAS 2016 ; published ahead of print September 6, 2016 - read abstract  
(http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2016/08/31/1605941113.abstract?sid=dd719211-83f5-4774-8a03-99d88cc238d6)

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15) Air pollution and diabetes association: Modification by type 2  
diabetes genetic risk score

Ikenna C. Eze, Medea Imboden, Ashish Kumar, Arnold von Eckardstein,  
Daiana Stolz, Margaret W. Gerbase, Nino Künzli, Marco Pons, Florian  
Kronenberg, Christian Schindler, Nicole Probst-Hensch

We study modification of PM10-diabetes association by type 2 diabetes  
genetic risk. We found an interaction between type 2 diabetes genetic  
risk and PM10, on diabetes. People at higher genetic risk for type 2  
diabetes may be more susceptible to PM10. Insulin resistance may be a  
more relevant pathway in the diabetogenic effects of PM.

Environment International 94, September 2016, 263–271 - read article  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016301611)

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16) Associations of oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers with  
chemically-characterized air pollutant exposures in an elderly cohort

Xian Zhang, Norbert Staimer, Daniel L. Gillen, Tomas Tjoa, James J.  
Schauer, Martin M. Shafer, Sina Hasheminassab, Payam Pakbin, Nosratola  
D. Vaziri, Constantinos Sioutas, Ralph J. Delfino

This study included 97 elderly adults with up to 12 repeated measures.  
Air pollution exposure was more clearly associated with airway than  
systemic biomarkers. Biomarkers were positively associated with  
traffic-related pollutants, ultrafine PM and transition metals.  
Positive but nonsignificant associations were observed for biomarkers  
with PM oxidative potential.

Environmental Research 150, October 2016, 306–319 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116302547)

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17) Association of novel metrics of particulate matter with vascular  
markers of inflammation and coagulation in susceptible populations  
–results from a panel study

Regina Rückerl, Alexandra Schneider, Regina Hampel, Susanne Breitner,  
Josef Cyrys, Ute Kraus, Jianwei Gu, Jens Soentgen, Wolfgang Koenig,  
Annette Peters

Novel attributes of particulate matter in association with blood  
biomarkers. Strong positive associations with particle length and  
active surface concentration. Harmful aerosol properties might be  
better reflected than by traditional pollutants. Potentially important  
for epidemiological studies.

Environmental Research 150, October 2016, 337–347 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116302092)

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18) Respiratory medication sales and urban air pollution in Brussels  
(2005 to 2011)

Lidia Casas, Koen Simons, Tim S. Nawrot, Olivier Brasseur, Priscilla  
Declerck, Ronald Buyl, Danny Coomans, Benoit Nemery, An Van Nieuwenhuyse

Air pollution is associated with increased sales of respiratory  
medications, even below European standards. The strongest associations  
are observed for NO2. Significant associations are observed from birth  
to young elderly ages.

Environment International 94, September 2016, 576–582 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016302379)

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19) Association between fine particulate matter chemical constituents  
and airway inflammation: A panel study among healthy adults in China

Jingjin Shi, Renjie Chen, Changyuan Yang, Zhijing Lin, Jing Cai,  
Yongjie Xia, Cuicui Wang, Huichu Li, Natalie Johnson, Xiaohui Xu,  
Zhuohui Zhao, Haidong Kan

The associations between PM2.5 constituents and FeNO levels were  
limited. We examined the effects of PM2.5 constituents in a panel of  
healthy adults. NH4+, NO3−, K+, SO42− and EC were associated with FeNO  
in 12 h after exposure. EC might be mainly responsible for the effects  
of PM2.5 on FeNO.

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20) Environmental Research 150, October 2016, 264–268 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116302572)

Ambient air pollution and risk of tuberculosis: a cohort study

Ting-Chun Lai, Chen-Yuan Chiang, Chang-Fu Wu, Shiang-Lin Yang,  
Ding-Ping Liu, Chang-Chuan Chan, Hsien-Ho Lin

Our study revealed a possible link between ambient air pollution and  
risk of active tuberculosis. Since people from developing countries  
continue to be exposed to high levels of ambient air pollution and to  
experience high rates of tuberculosis, the impact of worsening air  
pollution on global tuberculosis control warrants further investigation.

Occup Environ Med 2016;73:56-61 - read abstract  
(http://oem.bmj.com/content/73/1/56.abstract)

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21) Wastewater-based epidemiological evaluation of the effect of air  
pollution on short-acting beta-agonist consumption for acute asthma  
treatment

Elena Fattore, Enrico Davoli, Sara Castiglioni, Cristina Bosetti,  
Andrea Re Depaolini, Irene Marzona, Ettore Zuccato, Roberto Fanelli

A new application of the wastewater-based epidemiology is proposed.  
Daily consumption of salbutamol is correlated to air PM10 and PM2.5  
concentrations. The association between asthma and air pollution is  
confirmed.

Environmental Research 150, October 2016, 106–111 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116302237?np=y)

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22) Effect of the shape of the exposure-response function on estimated  
hospital costs in a study on non-elective pneumonia hospitalizations  
related to particulate matter

Stefanie Devos, Bianca Cox, Tom van Lier, Tim S. Nawrot, Koen Putman

Pneumonia hospitalizations are significantly associated with short  
term PM2.5 exposure. Public health is affected even under EU air  
quality guidelines. Estimates of health effects and associated costs  
depend on assumed E-R function. The choice on E-R function should be  
reflected in the policy making prioritisation. Further research in  
other settings is required to assess the shape of E-R function.

Environment International 94, September 2016, 525–530 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016302306)

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23) Residential proximity to traffic and female pubertal development

Laura A. McGuinn, Robert W. Voss, Cecile A. Laurent, Louise C.  
Greenspan, Lawrence H. Kushi, Gayle C. Windham

We assessed associations of traffic-related air pollution and altered  
puberty. Proximity to traffic was used as a marker of traffic-related  
air pollution exposure. Higher traffic exposure was associated with  
earlier onset of one pubertal milestone. Results should be expanded in  
larger studies and with measured levels of pollutants.

Environment International 94, September 2016, 635–641 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016302513)

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24) DNA hypomethylation and its mediation in the effects of fine  
particulate air pollution on cardiovascular biomarkers: A randomized  
crossover trial

Renjie Chen, Xia Meng, Ang Zhao, Cuicui Wang, Changyuan Yang, Huichu  
Li, Jing Cai, Zhuohui Zhao, Haidong Kan

It is unclear whether methylation mediates the cardiovascular effects  
of PM2.5. We tested methylation in 10 genes and biomarkers in a  
randomized controlled trial. PM2.5 may reduce DNA methylation in  
inflammation, coagulation and vasoconstriction. CD40LG hypomethylation  
may mediate the effect of PM2.5 on sCD40L protein.

Environment International 94, September 2016, 614–619 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016302446)

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25) Association between air pollution and coronary artery  
calcification within six metropolitan areas in the USA (the  
Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution): a  
longitudinal cohort study

Joel D Kaufman, Sara D Adar, R Graham Barr, Matthew Budoff, Gregory L  
Burke, Cynthia L Curl, Martha L Daviglus, Ana V Diez Roux, Amanda J  
Gassett, David R Jacobs Jr, Richard Kronmal, Timothy V Larson, Ana  
Navas-Acien, Casey Olives, Paul D Sampson, Lianne Sheppard, David S  
Siscovick, James H Stein, Adam A Szpiro, Karol E Watson

Increased concentrations of PM2·5 and traffic-related air pollution  
within metropolitan areas, in ranges commonly encountered worldwide,  
are associated with progression in coronary calcification, consistent  
with acceleration of atherosclerosis. This study supports the case for  
global efforts of pollution reduction in prevention of cardiovascular  
diseases.

The Lancet  388;10045 696–704, August 2016 - read article  
(http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(16)00378-0/fulltext)

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26) Personal exposure to fine particulate matter and blood pressure: A  
role of angiotensin converting enzyme and its DNA methylation

Cuicui Wang, Renjie Chen, Jing Cai, Jingjin Shi, Changyuan Yang, Lap  
Ah. Tse, Huichu Li, Zhijing Lin, Xia Meng, Cong Liu, Yue Niu, Yongjie  
Xia, Zhuohui Zhao, Haidong Kan

Personal exposure to PM2.5 was significantly associated with elevated  
BP. The first study examining the mediation of ACE protein in the  
effects of PM2.5 on BP. The first study examining the effects of PM2.5  
on ACE methylation. ACE and ACE methylation may mediate the effects of  
PM2.5 on BP.

Environment International 94, September 2016, 661–666 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016302598)

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27) Long-Term Exposure to Particulate Matter and Self-Reported  
Hypertension: A Prospective Analysis in the Nurses’ Health Study

Zhenyu Zhang, Francine Laden, John P. Forman, Jaime E. Hart

Long-term exposure to particulate matter was associated with small  
increases in risk of incident hypertension, particularly among younger  
women and the obese.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/EHP163 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/ehp163/)

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28) Ambient Fine Particulate Matter and Mortality among Survivors of  
Myocardial Infarction: Population-Based Cohort Study

Hong Chen, Richard T. Burnett, Ray Copes, Jeffrey C. Kwong, Paul J.  
Villeneuve, Mark S. Goldberg, Robert D. Brook, Aaron van Donkelaar,  
Michael Jerrett, Randall V. Martin, Jeffrey R. Brook, Alexander Kopp,  
Jack V. Tu

Long-term air pollution exposure adversely affects the survival of AMI  
patients.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/EHP185 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/ehp185/)

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29) Countervailing effects of income, air pollution, smoking, and  
obesity on aging and life expectancy: population-based study of U.S.  
Counties

Ryan T. Allen, Nicholas M. Hales, Andrea Baccarelli, Michael Jerrett,  
Majid Ezzati, Douglas W. Dockery, C. Arden Pope III

Higher incomes and lower levels of air pollution both correspond with  
increased human longevity. Adjusting for smoking and obesity reduces  
estimates of the benefits of higher income and lower air pollution  
exposure. This adjustment also alters the tradeoff between income and  
pollution: increases in income become less beneficial relative to a  
fixed reduction in air pollution—especially at higher levels of income.

Environ Health (2016) 15: 86. doi:10.1186/s12940-016-0168-2 - read  
article (http://link.springer.com/article/10.1186%2Fs12940-016-0168-2)

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30) Long-Term Exposure to Ambient Fine Particulate Matter and Renal  
Function in Older Men: The Veterans Administration Normative Aging Study

Amar J. Mehta, Antonella Zanobetti, Marie-Abele C. Bind, Itai Kloog,  
Petros Koutrakis, David Sparrow, Pantel S. Vokonas, Joel D. Schwartz

In this longitudinal sample of older men, the findings supported the  
hypothesis that long-term PM2.5 exposure negatively affects renal  
function and increases renal function decline.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/ehp.1510269 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/15-10269/)

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31) miRNA expression profiles and retinal blood vessel calibers are  
associated with short-term particulate matter air pollution exposure

Tijs Louwies, Caroline Vuegen, Luc Int Panis, Bianca Cox, Karen  
Vrijens, Tim S. Nawrot, Patrick De Boever

Particulate matter air pollution. Retinal microvascular changes.  
Central Retinal Arteriolar/Venular Equivalent. miRNA expression. miRNA  
expression mediates association air pollution microvascular changes.

Environmental Research 147, May 2016, 24–31 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116300275)

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32) Concentration dynamics of coarse and fine particulate matter at  
and around signalised traffic intersections

Prashant Kumar, Anju Goel

Signalised traffic intersections (TIs) are pollution hotspots that  
contribute disproportionately higher to overall commuting exposure.  
Studies characterising the exposure to coarse and fine particulate  
matter (PM) at such hotspots are yet limited. This study provides a  
comprehensive assessment of in-cabin exposure to fine and coarse PM  
under five different ventilation settings and compares in-cabin  
exposure at TIs with pedestrian exposure. The findings of this work  
advance our understanding of the zone of high PM pollution around TIs  
and assist in making an informed choice on ventilation settings of  
cars to limit exposure at such pollution hotspots.

Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2016, Advance Article - read article  
(http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2016/em/c6em00215c)

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33) Temperature-related mortality estimates after accounting for the  
cumulative effects of air pollution in an urban area

Svetlana Stanišić Stojić, Nemanja Stanišić, Andreja Stojić

These results suggest that, in polluted areas of developing countries,  
most of the mortality risk, previously attributed to cold  
temperatures, can be explained by the mid-term effects of air  
pollution. The results also showed that the estimated relative  
importance of PM10 was the smallest of four examined pollutant  
species, and thus, including PM10 data only is clearly not the most  
effective way to control for the effects of air pollution.

Environmental Health 201615:73 - read article  
(http://ehjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12940-016-0164-6)

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34) Using Social Media to Detect Outdoor Air Pollution and Monitor Air  
Quality Index (AQI): A Geo-Targeted Spatiotemporal Analysis Framework  
with Sina Weibo (Chinese Twitter)

Wei Jiang, Yandong Wang, Ming-Hsiang Tsou, Xiaokang Fu

This study focuses on monitoring the dynamic changes of air quality  
effectively in large cities by analyzing the spatiotemporal trends in  
geo-targeted social media messages with comprehensive big data  
filtering procedures. Our study indicates that the filtered social  
media messages are strongly correlated to the AQI and can be used to  
monitor the air quality dynamics to some extent.

PlosOne October 27, 2015 - read article  
(http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0141185)

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35) “Exposure Track”—The Impact of Mobile-Device-Based Mobility  
Patterns on Quantifying Population Exposure to Air Pollution

Marguerite Nyhan, Sebastian Grauwin, Rex Britter, Bruce Misstear,  
Aonghus McNabola, Francine Laden, Steven R. H. Barrett, Carlo Ratti

Evaluating population exposure to air pollution using spatiotemporal  
population mobility patterns warrants consideration in future  
environmental epidemiological studies linking air quality and human  
health.

Environ. Sci. Technol DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.6b02385 August 12, 2016 -  
read article (http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acs.est.6b02385)

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36) Car free cities: Pathway to healthy urban living

Mark J. Nieuwenhuijsen, Haneen Khreis

Hamburg and Oslo recently announced their plans to become (partly)  
private car free. This is likely to reduce greenhouse gases, air  
pollution, noise, and temperature. This can provide opportunities to  
increase green space and social interactions. This is likely to lead  
to higher levels of active transport and physical activity. All of  
which are likely to improve public health.
Environment International 94, September 2016, 251–262 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016302161)

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37) Short-term exposure to high ambient air pollution increases airway  
inflammation and respiratory symptoms in chronic obstructive pulmonary  
disease patients in Beijing, China

Shaowei Wu, Yang Ni, Hongyu Li, Lu Pan, Di Yang, Andrea A. Baccarelli,  
Furong Deng, Yahong Chen, Masayuki Shima, Xinbiao Guo

Few studies have investigated air pollution effects in COPD patients  
in China. Air pollution was associated with increased exhaled nitric  
oxide and hydrogen sulfide. Air pollution was also associated with  
increased odds ratios of respiratory symptoms. Exhaled hydrogen  
sulfide may serve as a novel marker to detect air pollution effects.  
Air pollution may pose risk to respiratory health in highly-polluted  
areas.

Environment International 94, September 2016, 76–82 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016301763)

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38) Air pollution exposure increases the risk of rheumatoid arthritis:  
A longitudinal and nationwide study

Kuang-Hsi Chang, Chih-Chao Hsu, Chih-Hsin Muo, Chung Y. Hsu, Hui-Chuan  
Liu, Chia-Hung Kao, Chiu-Ying Chen, Mei-Yin Chang, , Yi-Chao Hsu

The association between air pollution and the risk of rheumatoid  
arthritis remains unclear. We detected an increased risk of RA in  
participants exposed to PM2.5 and NO2. The results of this nationwide  
study suggest an increased risk of RA in residents exposed to NO2,  
particularly women.

Environment International 94, September 2016, 495–499 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016302264)

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39) Assessment of estrogenic and androgenic activity in PM10 air  
samples from an urban, industrial and rural area in Flanders (Belgium)  
using the CALUX bioassay

Kim Croes, Rosette Van den Heuvel, Bo Van den Bril, Jeroen Staelens,  
Michael S. Denison, Kersten Van Langenhove, Tara Vandermarken, Marc  
Elskens

Estrogenic activity was measured in 70% of the samples. In none of the  
samples androgenic activity was observed. Atmospheric PAHs explained  
25% of the estrogenic activity in the industrial area. Chemicals  
responsible for the majority of estrogenic activity remain to be  
identified.

Environmental Research 150, October 2016, 66–72 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S001393511630216X?np=y)

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40) State of the Air 2016 American Lung Foundation

The “State of the Air 2016” report shows that, even with continued  
improvement, too many people in the United States live where the air  
is unhealthy for them to breathe. Despite that continued need and the  
nation’s progress, some people seek to weaken the Clean Air Act, the  
public health law that has driven the cuts in pollution since 1970,  
and to undermine the ability of the nation to fight for healthy air.

157pp - read report  
(http://www.lung.org/assets/documents/healthy-air/state-of-the-air/sota-2016-full.pdf)

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41) Assessing concentrations and health impacts of air quality  
management strategies: Framework for Rapid Emissions Scenario and  
Health impact ESTimation (FRESH-EST)

Chad W. Milando, Sheena E. Martenies, Stuart A. Batterman

An integrated model, FRESH-EST, rapidly generates concentrations and  
health impacts. FRESH-EST optimizes emission reduction strategies for  
environmental and health goals. FRESH-EST optimizations met agency  
goals in a case study of an SO2 SIP in Detroit, MI. Optimized  
strategies can contribute to development of emission reduction  
scenarios.

Environment International 94, September 2016, 473–481 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016302239)

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42) Seasonal variation in outdoor, indoor, and personal air pollution  
exposures of women using wood stoves in the Tibetan Plateau: Baseline  
assessment for an energy intervention study

Kun Ni, Ellison Carter, James J. Schauer, Majid Ezzati, Yuanxun Zhang,  
Hongjiang Niu, Alexandra M. Lai, Ming Shan, Yuqin Wang, Xudong Yang,  
Jill Baumgartner

Household air pollution exposures for adult women in rural China  
double in winter relative to summer. In winter, primary heating with  
electricity or wood-charcoal and more frequent kitchen ventilation  
could reduce PM2.5 exposures. In summer, primary use of a gaseous fuel  
or electricity for cooking and reducing exposure to outdoor PM2.5  
could reduce PM2.5 exposures.

Environment International 94, September 2016, 449–457 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016302136)

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----------------------------------------------------------

Compiler and Editor: Barbara Rimmington, Researcher, East End Quality
of Life Initiative

10 Montgomery Terrace Road

Sheffield S6 3BU

Tel. 0114 285 9931

Fax 0114 278 7173

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