[cleanairuk_news] Health Effects of Air Quality and Noise - update June 2016

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* Health Effects of Air Quality and Noise - update June 2016 *

By Barbara Rimmington, Researcher, East End Quality of Life Initiative

(Previous edition - May 2016:
http://cleanairuk.org/pipermail/news_cleanairuk.org/2016-June/000099.html)

(Index for previous issues:
http://www.cleanairuk.org/health-air-pollution.html)

*CONTENTS*

1) Maternal Occupational Exposure to Noise during Pregnancy and  
Hearing Dysfunction in Children: A Nationwide Prospective Cohort Study  
in Sweden

2) Influence of solid noise barriers on near-road and on-road air quality

3) Global burden of stroke and risk factors in 188 countries, during  
1990–2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease  
Study 2013

4) Health Impact Assessment of a Predicted Air Quality Change by  
Moving Traffic from an Urban Ring Road into a Tunnel. The Case of  
Antwerp, Belgium

5) Cancer Mortality Risks from Long-term Exposure to Ambient Fine Particle

6) Ischemic Heart Disease Mortality and Long-Term Exposure to  
Source-Related Components of U.S. Fine Particle Air Pollution

7) Association between satellite-based estimates of long-term PM2.5  
exposure and coronary artery disease

8) Air Pollution and Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Nested Case–Control  
Study among Members of a Northern California Health Plan

9) A Time-Stratified Case-Crossover Study of Ambient Ozone Exposure  
and Emergency Department Visits for Specific Respiratory Diagnoses in  
California (2005–2008)

10) Does total antioxidant capacity modify adverse cardiac responses  
associated with ambient ultrafine, accumulation mode, and fine  
particles in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation?

11) Air pollution exposure increases the risk of rheumatoid arthritis:  
A longitudinal and nationwide study

12) Neurodevelopmental Deceleration by Urban Fine Particles from  
Different Emission Sources: A Longitudinal Observational Study

13) Intrauterine Inflammation and Maternal Exposure to Ambient PM2.5  
during Preconception and Specific Periods of Pregnancy: The Boston  
Birth Cohort

14) Perinatal air pollution exposure and development of asthma from  
birth to age 10 years

15) Prenatal ambient air pollution exposure and the risk of  
stillbirth: systematic review and meta-analysis of the empirical  
evidence

16) Air Pollution and Preterm Birth in the U.S. State of Georgia  
(2002–2006): Associations with Concentrations of 11 Ambient Air  
Pollutants Estimated by Combining Community Multiscale Air Quality  
Model (CMAQ) Simulations with Stationary Monitor Measurements

17) Multi-pollutant exposure profiles associated with term low birth  
weight in Los Angeles County

18) Schoolchildren's antioxidation genotypes are susceptible factors  
for reduced lung function and airway inflammation caused by air  
pollution

19) Identification of PM10 characteristics involved in cellular  
responses in human bronchial epithelial cells (Beas-2B)

- o -

1) Maternal Occupational Exposure to Noise during Pregnancy and  
Hearing Dysfunction in Children: A Nationwide Prospective Cohort Study  
in Sweden

Jenny Selander, Maria Albin, Ulf Rosenhall, Lars Rylander, Marie  
Lewné, Per Gustavsson

This study showed an association between occupational noise exposure  
during pregnancy and hearing dysfunction in children. In view of  
mechanistic evidence and earlier indicative epidemiological and  
experimental findings, the results support that pregnant women should  
not be exposed to high levels of noise at work.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/ehp.1509874 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/15-09874/)

- o -

2) Influence of solid noise barriers on near-road and on-road air quality

Richard W. Baldauf, Vlad Isakov, Parikshit Deshmukh, Akula Venkatram,  
Bo Yang, K. Max Zhang

Mobile monitoring measured near-road air quality impacts of a solid,  
noise barrier. Downwind concentration reductions of up to 50% occurred  
behind the barrier. Downwind reductions were highest within the first  
50 m from the road. Reductions extended as far as 300 m from the road.  
On-road levels did not increase in front of barrier, contrary to model  
predictions.

Atmospheric Environment 129, March 2016, 265–276 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231016300358)

- o -

3) Global burden of stroke and risk factors in 188 countries, during  
1990–2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease  
Study 2013

Valery L Feigin, Gregory A Roth, Mohsen Naghavi, Priya Parmar, Rita  
Krishnamurthi, Sumeet Chugh, George A Mensah, Bo Norrving, Ivy Shiue,  
Marie Ng, Kara Estep, Kelly Cercy, Christopher J L Murray, Prof  
Mohammad H Forouzanfar

Our results suggest that more than 90% of the stroke burden is  
attributable to modifiable risk factors, and achieving control of  
behavioural and metabolic risk factors could avert more than  
three-quarters of the global stroke burden. Air pollution has emerged  
as a significant contributor to global stroke burden, especially in  
low-income and middle-income countries, and therefore reducing  
exposure to air pollution should be one of the main priorities to  
reduce stroke burden in these countries.

The Lancet Neurology DOI:  
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1474-4422(16)30073-4 - read abstract  
(http://www.thelancet.com/journals/laneur/article/PIIS1474-4422(16)30073-4/abstract)

- o -

4) Health Impact Assessment of a Predicted Air Quality Change by  
Moving Traffic from an Urban Ring Road into a Tunnel. The Case of  
Antwerp, Belgium

Daan Van Brusselen, Wouter Arrazola de Oñate, Bino Maiheu, Stijn  
Vranckx, Wouter Lefebvre, Stijn Janssen, Tim S Nawrot, Ben Nemery,  
Dirk Avonts

The expected change in PM2,5 and NO2 by covering the entire urban ring  
road in Antwerp is associated with considerable health gains for the  
approximate 352,000 inhabitants living in a 1,500 meter perimeter  
around the current open air ring road.

PlosONE May 2016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0154052 - read  
article  
(http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0154052)

- o -

5) Cancer Mortality Risks from Long-term Exposure to Ambient Fine Particle

Chit Ming Wong, Hilda Tsang, Hak Kan Lai, G. Neil Thomas, Kin Bong  
Lam, King Pan Chan, Qishi Zheng, Jon G. Ayres, Siu Yin Lee, Tai Hing  
Lam, Thuan Quoc Thach

Long-term exposures to PM2.5 are associated with elevated risks of  
cancer in various organs.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(5); 839–45 - read abstract  
(http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/25/5/839.abstract)

- o -

6) Ischemic Heart Disease Mortality and Long-Term Exposure to  
Source-Related Components of U.S. Fine Particle Air Pollution

George D. Thurston, Richard T. Burnett, Michelle C. Turner, Yuanli  
Shi, Daniel Krewski, Ramona Lall, Kazuhiko Ito, Michael Jerrett, Susan  
M. Gapstur, W. Ryan Diver, C. Arden Pope III

Long-term PM2.5 exposures from fossil fuel combustion, especially coal  
burning but also from diesel traffic, were associated with increases  
in IHD mortality in this nationwide population. Results suggest that  
PM2.5–mortality associations can vary greatly by source, and that the  
largest IHD health benefits per microgram/cubic meter from PM2.5 air  
pollution control may be achieved via reductions of fossil fuel  
combustion exposures, especially from coal-burning sources.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/ehp.1509777 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/15-09777/)

- o -

7) Association between satellite-based estimates of long-term PM2.5  
exposure and coronary artery disease

Laura A. McGuinn, Cavin K. Ward-Caviness, Lucas M. Neas, Alexandra  
Schneider, David Diaz-Sanchez, Wayne E. Cascio, William E. Kraus,  
Elizabeth Hauser, Elaine Dowdy, Carol Haynes, Alexandra Chudnovsky,  
Petros Koutrakis, Robert B. Devlin

Satellite-based estimates of long-term PM2.5 exposure were associated  
with both coronary artery disease (CAD) and incidence of myocardial  
infarction (MI) in a cohort of cardiac catheterization patients.

Environmental Research 145, February 2016, 9–17 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935115301249)

- o -

8) Air Pollution and Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Nested Case–Control  
Study among Members of a Northern California Health Plan

Geneé S. Smith, Stephen K. Van Den Eeden, Cynthia Garcia, Jun Shan,  
Roger Baxter, Amy H. Herring, David B. Richardson, Annelies Van Rie,  
Michael Emch, Marilie D. Gammon

In this first, to our knowledge, U.S. nested case–control study on air  
pollution and pulmonary TB, we observed positive associations with  
ambient CO and NO2, which require confirmation.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/ehp.1408166 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/14-08166/)

- o -

9) A Time-Stratified Case-Crossover Study of Ambient Ozone Exposure  
and Emergency Department Visits for Specific Respiratory Diagnoses in  
California (2005–2008)

Brian J. Malig, Dharshani L. Pearson, Yun Brenda Chang, Rachel  
Broadwin, Rupa Basu, Rochelle S. Green, Bart Ostro

Short-term ozone exposures among California residents living near an  
ozone monitor were positively associated with EDVs for asthma, ARI,  
pneumonia, COPD, and URTI from 2005 through 2008. Those associations  
were typically larger and more consistent during the warm season. Our  
findings suggest that these outcomes should be considered when  
evaluating the potential health benefits of reducing ozone  
concentrations.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/ehp.1409495 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/14-09495/)

- o -

10) Does total antioxidant capacity modify adverse cardiac responses  
associated with ambient ultrafine, accumulation mode, and fine  
particles in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation?

Meng Wang, Mark J. Utell, Alexandra Schneider, Wojciech Zareba, Mark  
W. Frampton, David Oakes, Philip K. Hopke, Jelani Wiltshire, Cathleen  
Kane, Annette Peters, Susanne Breitner, David Chalupa, David Q. Rich

Ambient PM pollution associated with increased inflammation, blood  
pressure, & HRV. Total antioxidant capacity does not modify blood  
pressure responses to ambient PM. Total antioxidant capacity does not  
modify inflammatory responses to ambient PM. Total antioxidant  
capacity does not modify HRV responses to ambient PM. Total  
antioxidant capacity does not modify T-wave complexity responses to  
ambient PM.

Environmental Research 149, August 2016, 15–22 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116301554)

- o -

11) Air pollution exposure increases the risk of rheumatoid arthritis:  
A longitudinal and nationwide study

Kuang-Hsi Chang, Chih-Chao Hsu, Chih-Hsin Muo, Chung Y. Hsu, Hui-Chuan  
Liu, Chia-Hung Kao, Chiu-Ying Chen, Mei-Yin Chang, Yi-Chao Hsu

The association between air pollution and the risk of rheumatoid  
arthritis remains unclear. We detected an increased risk of RA in  
participants exposed to PM2.5 and NO2. The results of this nationwide  
study suggest an increased risk of RA in residents exposed to NO2,  
particularly women.

Environment International Available online 11 June 2016 - read  
abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016302264)

- o -

12) Neurodevelopmental Deceleration by Urban Fine Particles from  
Different Emission Sources: A Longitudinal Observational Study

Xavier Basagaña, Mikel Esnaola, Ioar Rivas, Fulvio Amato, Mar  
Alvarez-Pedrerol, Joan Forns, Mònica López-Vicente, Jesús Pujol, Mark  
Nieuwenhuijsen, Xavier Querol, Jordi Sunyer

Traffic was the only source of fine particles associated with a  
reduction in cognitive development. Reducing air pollution from  
traffic at primary schools may result in beneficial effects on  
cognition.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/EHP209 - read abstract  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/ehp209/) (advance publication)

- o -

13) Intrauterine Inflammation and Maternal Exposure to Ambient PM2.5  
during Preconception and Specific Periods of Pregnancy: The Boston  
Birth Cohort

Rebecca Massa Nachman, Guangyun Mao, Xingyou Zhang, Xiumei Hong, Zhu  
Chen, Claire Sampankanpanich Soria, Huan He, Guoying Wang, Deanna  
Caruso, Colleen Pearson, Shyam Biswal, Barry Zuckerman, Marsha  
Wills-Karp, Xiaobin Wang

Despite relatively low exposures, our results suggest a monotonic  
positive relationship between PM2.5 exposure during preconception and  
pregnancy and IUI. IUI may be a sensitive biomarker for assessing  
early biological effect of PM2.5 exposure on the developing fetus.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/EHP243 - read abstract  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/EHP243/) (advance publication)

- o -

14) Perinatal air pollution exposure and development of asthma from  
birth to age 10 years

Hind Sbihi, Lillian Tamburic, Mieke Koehoorn, Michael Brauer

Within-city air pollution variation was associated with new asthma  
onset during the pre-school years.

European Respiratory Journal DOI: 10.1183/13993003.00746-2015  
Published 1 April 2016 - read abstract  
(http://erj.ersjournals.com/content/47/4/1062)

- o -

15) Prenatal ambient air pollution exposure and the risk of  
stillbirth: systematic review and meta-analysis of the empirical  
evidence

Nazeeba Siddika, Hamudat A Balogun, Adeladza K Amegah, Jouni J K Jaakkola

The body of evidence suggests that exposure to ambient air pollution  
increases the risk of stillbirth. Further studies are needed to  
strengthen the evidence.
Occup Environ Med doi:10.1136/oemed-2015-103086 - read abstract  
(http://oem.bmj.com/content/early/2016/04/28/oemed-2015-103086.abstract?sid=ec91055a-bb29-4050-b06a-c8c3770e4fc6)

- o -

16) Air Pollution and Preterm Birth in the U.S. State of Georgia  
(2002–2006): Associations with Concentrations of 11 Ambient Air  
Pollutants Estimated by Combining Community Multiscale Air Quality  
Model (CMAQ) Simulations with Stationary Monitor Measurements

Hua Hao, Howard H. Chang, Heather A. Holmes, James A. Mulholland,  
Mitch Klein, Lyndsey A. Darrow, Matthew J. Strickland

Several ambient air pollutants were associated with preterm birth;  
associations were observed in all exposure windows.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/ehp.1409651 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/14-09651/)

- o -

17) Multi-pollutant exposure profiles associated with term low birth  
weight in Los Angeles County

Eric Coker, Silvia Liverani, Jo Kay Ghosh, Michael Jerrett, Bernardo  
Beckerman, Arthur Li, Beate Ritz, John Molitor

Pollutant profiles across LA County reveal distinct localized spatial  
patterns. Pollutant profile effects on term low birth weight (TLBW)  
may be non-linear. Profiles reflective of primary traffic emissions  
displayed highest TLBW risk. High risk contextual profiles and high  
risk pollutant profiles overlap spatially. Profile regression shows  
potential for investigation of multipollutant health risks.

Environment International 91, May 2016, 1–13 - read article  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016300460)

- o -

18) Schoolchildren's antioxidation genotypes are susceptible factors  
for reduced lung function and airway inflammation caused by air  
pollution

Bing-Yu Chen, Chi-Hsien Chen, Yu-Chen Chuang, Ho Kim, Yasushi Honda,  
Hung-Che Chiang, Yue Leon Guo

Children with null GSTM1 genotype were susceptible to PM2.5-enhanced  
airway inflammation. Children with SOD2 Ala16 variant were susceptible  
to ozone-related decrement in FEF25%. Ozone-related decrements in  
FEF50%, FEF75%, and FEF25–75% were observed, regardless of genotype.  
Antioxidation genotype modifies the airway inflammation caused by  
PM2.5. Antioxidation genotype acts as an effect modifier, but not  
strong, in ozone-related small airway function response.

Environmental Research 149, August 2016, 145–150 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116301700)

- o -

19) Identification of PM10 characteristics involved in cellular  
responses in human bronchial epithelial cells (Beas-2B)

Rosette Van Den Heuvel, Elly Den Hond, Eva Govarts, Ann Colles, Gudrun  
Koppen, Jeroen Staelens, Maja Mampaey, Nicole Janssen, Greet Schoeters

On an equal mass basis, PM10 sampled at an urban, rural and industrial  
site induced different cellular effects in Beas-2B. Endotoxin levels  
and oxidative potential (OP) were analysed in the PM10 samples. Black  
carbon, cadmium and lead were correlated with decreased cell  
viability. Endotoxin levels explained the majority of the variance in  
il-8 induction. Oxidatively damaged DNA was observed in all the samples.

Environmental Research 149, August 2016, 48–56 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116301530)

- o -

----------------------------------------------------------

Compiler and Editor: Barbara Rimmington, Researcher, East End Quality
of Life Initiative

10 Montgomery Terrace Road

Sheffield S6 3BU

Tel. 0114 285 9931

Fax 0114 278 7173

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