[cleanairuk_news] Health Effects of Air Quality and Noise - update May 2016

contact at cleanairuk.org contact at cleanairuk.org
Thu Jun 30 15:37:09 BST 2016


* Health Effects of Air Quality and Noise - update May 2016 *

By Barbara Rimmington, Researcher, East End Quality of Life Initiative

(Previous edition - April 2016:
http://cleanairuk.org/pipermail/news_cleanairuk.org/2016-May/000098.html)

(Index for previous issues:
http://www.cleanairuk.org/health-air-pollution.html)

*CONTENTS*

1) Long-term exposure to residential traffic noise and changes in body  
weight and waist circumference: A cohort study

2) Environmental noise and incident mental health problems: A  
prospective cohort study among school children in Germany

3) Residential Road Traffic Noise and High Depressive Symptoms after  
Five Years of Follow-up: Results from the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study

4) Spatial and temporal associations of road traffic noise and air  
pollution in London: Implications for epidemiological studies

5) Can air pollution negate the health benefits of cycling and walking?

6) Air pollution in perspective: Health risks of air pollution  
expressed in equivalent numbers of passively smoked cigarettes

7) Short term effect of air pollution, noise and heat waves on preterm  
births in Madrid (Spain)

8) Small for gestational age and exposure to particulate air pollution  
in the early-life environment of twins

9) The associations between birth weight and exposure to fine  
particulate matter (PM2.5) and its chemical constituents during  
pregnancy: A meta-analysis

10) A national study of the association between traffic-related air  
pollution and adverse pregnancy outcomes in Canada, 1999–2008

11) Air Pollution Exposure During Pregnancy and Fetal Markers of  
Metabolic function The MIREC Study

12) Prenatal Air Pollution Exposure and Early Cardiovascular  
Phenotypes in Young Adults

13) Prenatal Ambient Air Pollution, Placental Mitochondrial DNA  
Content, and Birth Weight in the INMA (Spain) and ENVIRONAGE (Belgium)  
Birth Cohorts

14) Air pollution exposure and preeclampsia among US women with and  
without asthma

15) Early life exposure to ambient air pollution and childhood asthma in China

16) Air pollution-induced placental epigenetic alterations in early  
life: a candidate miRNA approach

17) Association between prenatal exposure to ambient diesel  
particulate matter and perchloroethylene with children's 3rd grade  
standardized test scores

18) Ambient air pollution and adverse birth outcomes: Differences by  
maternal comorbidities

19) Pediatric Emergency Visits and Short-Term Changes in PM2.5  
Concentrations in the U.S. State of Georgia

20) Traffic-related air pollution and risk for leukaemia of an adult  
population

21) Traffic-related air pollution and childhood acute leukemia in Oklahoma

22) Genetic Variants in the Bone Morphogenic Protein Gene Family  
Modify the Association between Residential Exposure to Traffic and  
Peripheral Arterial Disease

23) Adult air pollution exposure and risk of infertility in the  
Nurses' Health Study
II

24) Historic air pollution exposure and long-term mortality risks in  
England and Wales: prospective longitudinal cohort study

25) Is long-term exposure to traffic pollution associated with  
mortality? A small-area study in London

26) Long-term exposure to traffic pollution and hospital admissions in London

27) COMEAP: long-term exposure to air pollution and chronic bronchitis

28) Fine particulate matter components and mortality in Greater  
Houston: Did the risk reduce from 2000 to 2011?

29) Fine Particle Pollution, Alanine Transaminase, and Liver Cancer: A  
Taiwanese Prospective Cohort Study (REVEAL-HBV)

30) Fine Particulate Air Pollution and Hospital Emergency Room Visits  
for Respiratory Disease in Urban Areas in Beijing, China, in 2013

31) Effects of particulate matter exposure on multiple sclerosis  
hospital admission in Lombardy region, Italy

32) Occupational vehicle-related particulate exposure and inflammatory  
markers in trucking industry workers

33) On-bicycle exposure to particulate air pollution: Particle number,  
black carbon, PM2.5, and particle size

34) The modifying effect of socioeconomic status on the relationship  
between traffic, air pollution and respiratory health in elementary  
schoolchildren

35) Real-time indoor and outdoor measurements of black carbon at  
primary schools

36) Understanding how roadside concentrations of NOx are influenced by  
the background levels, traffic density, and meteorological conditions  
using Boosted Regression Trees

37) Air quality improvements following implementation of Lisbon's Low  
Emission Zone

38) Measuring exposure levels of inhalable airborne particles (PM2.5)  
in two socially deprived areas of Nairobi, Kenya

39) Short-term exposure to air pollution and morbidity of COPD and  
asthma in East Asian area: A systematic review and meta-analysis

40) Long term exposure to NO2 and diabetes incidence in the Black  
Women's Health Study

41) A structured review of panel studies used to investigate  
associations between ambient air pollution and heart rate variability

42) Use of Dieselized Farm Equipment and Incident Lung Cancer:  
Findings from the Agricultural Health Study Cohort

43) Evaluation of diesel fleet emissions and control policies from  
plume chasing measurements of on-road vehicles

44) Impact of trees on pollutant dispersion in street canyons: A  
numerical study of the annual average effects in Antwerp, Belgium

45) Passive control potentials of trees and on-street parked cars in  
reduction of air pollution exposure in urban street canyons

46) Passive methods for improving air quality in the built  
environment: A review of porous and solid barriers

- o -

1) Long-term exposure to residential traffic noise and changes in body  
weight and waist circumference: A cohort study

Jeppe S. Christensen, Ole Raaschou-Nielsen, Anne Tjønneland, Rikke B.  
Nordsborg, Steen S. Jensen, Thorkild I.A. Sørensen, Mette Sørensen

Traffic noise induce sleep disturbance and stress. Sleep disturbances  
and stress may affect the human metabolism and lead to changes in  
weight and waist circumference. A nationwide case-control study with  
historical, residential modeling of traffic noise. We find small  
effects of traffic noise on development of adiposity.

Environmental Research 143, Part A, November 2015, 154–161 - read  
abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935115301055)

- o -

2) Environmental noise and incident mental health problems: A  
prospective cohort study among school children in Germany

Stefanie Dreger, Nicole Meyer, Hermann Fromme, Gabriele Bolte, for the  
Study Group of the GME cohort

Exposure to noise may impair children's mental health. First cohort  
study on health impacts of several environmental noise sources at  
home. Association of noise exposure with incident children's mental  
health problems. Road traffic noise and noise by neighbours play a  
major role. Results further strengthen the need to prevent  
environmental noise exposure.

Environmental Research 143, Part A, November 2015, 49–54 - read  
abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935115300475)

- o -

3) Residential Road Traffic Noise and High Depressive Symptoms after  
Five Years of Follow-up: Results from the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study

Ester Orban, Kelsey McDonald, Robynne Sutcliffe, Barbara Hoffmann,  
Kateryna B. Fuks, Nico Dragano, Anja Viehmann, Raimund Erbel,  
Karl-Heinz Jöckel, Noreen Pundt, Susanne Moebus

Our results suggest that exposure to residential road traffic noise  
increases the risk of depressive symptoms.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/ehp.1409400 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/14-09400/)

- o -

4) Spatial and temporal associations of road traffic noise and air  
pollution in London: Implications for epidemiological studies

Daniela Fecht, Anna L. Hansell, David Morley, David Dajnak, Danielle  
Vienneau, Sean Beevers, Mireille B. Toledano, Frank J. Kelly, H. Ross  
Anderson, John Gulliver

Largest study of the relationship of noise and air pollution in space  
and time. Correlations of noise and air pollution metrics across  
different spatial units. Overall moderate correlations between levels  
of noise and air pollution in London. Correlations vary greatly in  
magnitude by size of spatial unit. Studies should consider the  
variability in co-linearity of noise and air pollution.

Environment International 88, March 2016, 235–242 - read article  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412015301057)

- o -

5) Can air pollution negate the health benefits of cycling and walking?

Marko Tainio, Audrey J. de Nazelle, Thomas Götschi, Sonja Kahlmeier,  
David Rojas-Rueda, Mark J. Nieuwenhuijsen, Thiago Hérick de Sá, Paul  
Kelly, James Woodcock

Air pollution (AP) may reduce the health benefits of active travel  
(AT). We compared risk–benefit trade-off of AP and physical activity  
(PA) due to AT. In most urban environments benefits of PA outweighed  
risks of AP. If cycling replaces driving, the trade-off would be even  
more beneficial.

Preventive Medicine May 2016 - read corrected proof article  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0091743516000402)

- o -

6) Air pollution in perspective: Health risks of air pollution  
expressed in equivalent numbers of passively smoked cigarettes

Saskia C. van der Zee, Paul H. Fischer, Gerard Hoek

A tool was developed to express health risks of air pollution in a  
simple manner. Health effects of air pollution are expressed into  
passive smoke-equivalents. Based on equivalent health risk for air  
pollution and passive smoking. Living near a freeway is equivalent to  
10 daily passively smoked cigarettes.
Environmental Research 148, July 2016, 475–483 - read article  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116301268)

- o -

7) Short term effect of air pollution, noise and heat waves on preterm  
births in Madrid (Spain)

Virginia Arroyo, Julio Díaz, Cristina Ortiz, Rocío Carmona, Marc Sáez,  
Cristina Linares

Epidemiologic studies show elevated risks of PTB with environmental  
variables. A time-series analysis was performed to assess the short  
term impact. PM2.5 and heat waves at lag 1 and noise at lag 0 are  
influencing PTB. Exists an acute effect on PTB of the environmental  
variables analyzed.

Environmental Research 145, February 2016, 162–168 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935115301626)

- o -

8) Small for gestational age and exposure to particulate air pollution  
in the early-life environment of twins

Esmée M. Bijnens, Catherine Derom, Marij Gielen, Ellen Winckelmans,  
Frans Fierens, Robert Vlietinck, Maurice P. Zeegers, Tim S. Nawrot

Exposure to air pollution is associated with restricted fetal growth  
in singletons. No studies have investigated the association of air  
pollution with birth weight and small for gestational age in twins.  
Maternal air pollution (PM10 and NO2) exposure was estimated over  
various time windows during pregnancy in 4,760 twins. Air pollution is  
associated with small for gestational age and birth weight in moderate  
to late preterm born twins. The within-pair difference in birth weight  
increases with higher air pollution exposure during the last month of  
pregnancy.

Environmental Research 148, July 2016, 39–45 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S001393511630086X)

- o -

9) The associations between birth weight and exposure to fine  
particulate matter (PM2.5) and its chemical constituents during  
pregnancy: A meta-analysis

Xiaoli Sun, Xiping Luo, Chunmei Zhao, Bo Zhang, Jun Tao, Zuyao Yang,  
Wenjun Ma, Tao Liu

Effects of prenatal PM2.5 exposure on birth weight were assessed. A  
meta-analysis was performed on studies published before March 2015.  
PM2.5 exposure during pregnancy might induce lower birth weight. Late  
pregnancy might be the critical window of PM2.5 effects. Some specific  
PM2.5 constituents may have larger toxic effects on fetal weight.

Environmental Pollution 211, April 2016, 38–47 - read article  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749115302360)

- o -

10) A national study of the association between traffic-related air  
pollution and adverse pregnancy outcomes in Canada, 1999–2008

David M. Stieb, Li Chen, Perry Hystad, Bernardo S. Beckerman, Michael  
Jerrett, Michael Tjepkema, Daniel L. Crouse, D. Walter Omariba, Paul  
A. Peters, Aaron van Donkelaar, Randall V. Martin, Richard T. Burnett,  
Shiliang Liu, Marc Smith-Doiron, Rose M. Dugandzic

Study of approximately 2.5 million Canadian births between 1999 and  
2008. Employed a national nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exposure model. NO2  
associated with small for gestational age (SGA) and reduced term birth  
weight. Associations remained significant after adjustment for PM2.5.  
Traffic-related air pollution may increase risk of SGA and reduce term  
birth weight.

Environmental Research 148, July 2016, 513–526 - read article  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116301487)

- o -

11) Air Pollution Exposure During Pregnancy and Fetal Markers of  
Metabolic function The MIREC Study

Eric Lavigne, Jillian Ashley-Martin, Linda Dodds, Tye E. Arbuckle,  
Perry Hystad, Markey Johnson, Dan L. Crouse, Adrienne S. Ettinger,  
Gabriel D. Shapiro, Mandy Fisher, Anne-Sophie Morisset, Shayne Taback,  
Maryse F. Bouchard, Liu Sun, Patricia Monnier, Renée Dallaire, William  
D. Fraser

Significant associations were seen between air pollution markers and  
cord blood leptin levels in models that adjusted for birth weight z  
score but not in models that did not adjust for birth weight z score.  
The roles of prenatal exposure to air pollution and fetal metabolic  
function in the potential development of childhood obesity should be  
further explored.

Am. J. Epidemiol. (2016) 183 (9): 842-851 - read abstract  
(http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/183/9/842.abstract?etoc)

- o -

12) Prenatal Air Pollution Exposure and Early Cardiovascular  
Phenotypes in Young Adults

Carrie V. Breton , Wendy J. Mack, Jin Yao, Kiros Berhane, Milena  
Amadeus, Fred Lurmann, Frank Gilliland, Rob McConnell, Howard N.  
Hodis, Nino Künzli, Ed Avol

Prenatal exposure to elevated air pollutants may increase carotid  
arterial stiffness in a young adult population of college students.  
Efforts aimed at limiting prenatal exposures are important public  
health goals.

PlosOne March 2016 - read article  
(http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0150825)

- o -

13) Prenatal Ambient Air Pollution, Placental Mitochondrial DNA  
Content, and Birth Weight in the INMA (Spain) and ENVIRONAGE (Belgium)  
Birth Cohorts

Diana B.P. Clemente, Maribel Casas, Nadia Vilahur, Haizea Begiristain,  
Mariona Bustamante, Anne-Elie Carsin, Mariana F. Fernández, Frans  
Fierens, Wilfried Gyselaers, Carmen Iñiguez, Bram G. Janssen, Wouter  
Lefebvre, Sabrina Llop, Nicolás Olea, Marie Pedersen, Nicky Pieters,  
Loreto Santa Marina, Ana Souto, Adonina Tardón, Charlotte Vanpoucke,  
Martine Vrijheid, Jordi Sunyer, Tim S. Nawrot

Our results suggest that mtDNA content can be one of the potential  
mediators of the association between prenatal air pollution exposure  
and birth weight.
Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/ehp.1408981 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/1408981/)

- o -

14) Air pollution exposure and preeclampsia among US women with and  
without asthma

Pauline Mendola, Maeve Wallace, Danping Liu, Candace Robledo, Tuija  
Mӓnnistӧ, Katherine L. Grantz

Asthma is common in pregnancy and asthmatic women have increased  
preeclampsia risk. Air pollution could differentially increase  
preeclampsia risk for asthmatic women. Preeclampsia risk was higher  
for asthmatics than non-asthmatics after VOC exposure. Asthmatics also  
had higher risk after whole pregnancy exposure to elemental carbon.  
Pregnant women with asthma appear to be particularly vulnerable to air  
pollutants.

Environmental Research 148, July 2016, 248–255 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116301281)

- o -

15) Early life exposure to ambient air pollution and childhood asthma in China

Qihong Deng, Chan Lu, Dan Norbäck, Carl-Gustaf Bornehag, Yinping  
Zhang, Weiwei Liu, Hong Yuan, Jan Sundell

Early life exposure to ambient air pollution is associated with  
childhood asthma. Level and source of air pollution act important  
roles in the development of asthma. Asthmatic risk of air pollution is  
higher for the male and the younger. Combined industrial and traffic  
air pollution elevates the asthmatic risk. Asthmatic risk of  
industrial air pollution in China cannot be overlooked.

Environmental Research 143, Part A, November 2015, 83–92 - read  
abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935115300980)

- o -

16) Air pollution-induced placental epigenetic alterations in early  
life: a candidate miRNA approach

Maria Tsamou, Karen Vrijens, Narjes Madhloum, Wouter Lefebvre,  
Charlotte Vanpoucke, Tim S Nawrot

Within the framework of the ENVIRONAGE birth cohort, we measured the  
expression of six candidate miRNAs in placental tissue from 210  
mother-newborn pairs by qRT-PCR.

Epigenetics 10.1080/15592294.2016.1155012 - read abstract  
(http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15592294.2016.1155012)

- o -

17) Association between prenatal exposure to ambient diesel  
particulate matter and perchloroethylene with children's 3rd grade  
standardized test scores

Jeanette A. Stingone, Katharine H. McVeigh, Luz Claudio

We assessed associations between diesel and perchloroethylene on  
children's test scores. Greater prenatal exposure to both pollutants  
was associated with lower math scores. Combined effects of individual  
pollutants may additively impact children's health.

Environmental Research 148, July 2016, 144–153 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116301165)

- o -

18) Ambient air pollution and adverse birth outcomes: Differences by  
maternal comorbidities

Eric Lavigne, Abdool S. Yasseen III, David M. Stieb, Perry Hystad,  
Aaron van Donkelaar, Randall V. Martin, Jeffrey R. Brook, Daniel L.  
Crouse, Richard T. Burnett, Hong Chen, Scott Weichenthal, Markey  
Johnson, Paul J. Villeneuve, Mark Walker

Prenatal exposure to air pollution is associated with adverse birth  
outcomes. Effects of PM2.5 and NO2 on preterm birth are higher among  
diabetic mothers. Effects of ozone on preterm birth are higher among  
mothers with asthma.

Environmental Research 148, July 2016, 457–466 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116301517)

- o -

19) Pediatric Emergency Visits and Short-Term Changes in PM2.5  
Concentrations in the U.S. State of Georgia

Matthew J. Strickland, Hua Hao,1 Xuefei Hu, Howard H. Chang, Lyndsey  
A. Darrow, Yang Liu

Pediatric ED visits for asthma or wheeze and for upper respiratory  
infections were associated with PM2.5 concentrations in Georgia.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/ehp.1509856 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/15-09856/)

- o -

20) Traffic-related air pollution and risk for leukaemia of an adult  
population

Ole Raaschou-Nielsen, Matthias Ketzel, Aslak Harbo Poulsen, Mette Sørensen

This study indicates an association between long-term exposure to  
traffic-related air pollution and acute myeloid leukaemia in the  
general population, but not for other subtypes of leukaemia.

International Journal of Cancer 138,5 1111–1117, 1 March 2016 - read  
abstract (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ijc.29867/abstract)

21) Traffic-related air pollution and childhood acute leukemia in Oklahoma

Amanda E. Janitz, Janis E. Campbell, Sheryl Magzamen, Anne Pate, Julie  
A. Stoner, Jennifer D. Peck

Association between traffic-related air pollution and childhood  
leukemia. Novel measurement of nitrogen dioxide using satellite-based  
model. First to observe association between nitrogen dioxide and acute  
myeloid leukemia.

Environmental Research 148, July 2016, 102–111 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116301177)

- o -

22) Genetic Variants in the Bone Morphogenic Protein Gene Family  
Modify the Association between Residential Exposure to Traffic and  
Peripheral Arterial Disease

Cavin K. Ward-Caviness, Lucas M. Neas, Colette Blach, Carol S. Haynes,  
Karen LaRocque-Abramson, Elizabeth Grass, Elaine Dowdy, Robert B.  
Devlin, David Diaz-Sanchez, Wayne E. Cascio, Marie Lynn Miranda, Simon  
G. Gregory, Svati H. Shah, William E. Kraus, Elizabeth R. Hauser

These results reveal a novel gene, and possibly gene family,  
associated with PAD via an interaction with traffic air pollution  
exposure. These results also highlight the potential for interactions  
studies, particularly at the genome scale, to reveal novel biology  
linking environmental exposures to clinical outcomes.

PlosOne April 2016 - read article  
(http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0152670)

- o -

23) Adult air pollution exposure and risk of infertility in the  
Nurses' Health Study II

S. Mahalingaiah, J.E Hart, F. Laden, L.V. Farland, M.M. Hewlett, J.  
Chavarro, A. Aschengrau, S.A Missmer

We observed an association between all size fractions of PM exposure,  
as well as traffic-related air pollution, and incidence of  
infertility. Of note, the strongest association was observed between  
cumulative average exposures over the course of follow-up and the risk  
of infertility, suggesting that chronic exposures may be of greater  
importance than short-term exposures.

Hum. Reprod. (2016) 31 (3): 638-647 - read abstract  
(http://humrep.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/3/638.abstract)

- o -

24) Historic air pollution exposure and long-term mortality risks in  
England and Wales: prospective longitudinal cohort study

Anna Hansell, Rebecca E Ghosh, Marta Blangiardo, Chloe Perkins,  
Danielle Vienneau, Kayoung Goffe, David Briggs, John Gulliver

This large national study suggests that air pollution exposure has  
long-term effects on mortality that persist decades after exposure,  
and that historic air pollution exposures influence current estimates  
of associations between air pollution and mortality.

Thorax 2016;71:330-338 doi:10.1136/thoraxjnl-2015-207111 - read  
article  
(http://thorax.bmj.com/content/71/4/330.full?sid=f14e9649-5c9f-46c8-979d-6d2381bfd147)

- o -

25) Is long-term exposure to traffic pollution associated with  
mortality? A small-area study in London

Jaana I. Halonen, Marta Blangiardo, Mireille B. Toledano, Daniela  
Fecht, John Gulliver, Rebecca Ghosh, H. Ross Anderson, Sean D.  
Beevers, David Dajnak, Frank J. Kelly, Paul Wilkinson, Cathryn Tonne

Evidence of association between primary traffic pollutants and  
mortality is scarce. We examined this in a large city using most  
recent small-area statistical methods. Overall, there was only weak  
evidence of positive associations with mortality.

Environmental Pollution 208, Part A, January 2016, 25–32 - read  
article (http://
www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749115003292)

- o -

26) Long-term exposure to traffic pollution and hospital admissions in London

Jaana I. Halonen, Marta Blangiardo, Mireille B. Toledano, Daniela  
Fecht, John Gulliver, H. Ross Anderson, Sean D. Beevers, David Dajnak,  
Frank J. Kelly, Cathryn Tonne

Evidence concerning associations between traffic pollutants and  
morbidity is scarce. We addressed this using state of the art  
small-area statistical methods. There was no convincing evidence of  
positive linear associations with admissions.

Environmental Pollution 208, Part A, January 2016, 48–57 - read  
article  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749115300993)

- o -

27) COMEAP: long-term exposure to air pollution and chronic bronchitis

This report presents an assessment of the evidence on long-term  
exposure to ambient air pollutants and chronic bronchitis and  
respiratory symptoms. The Committee found some evidence of an  
association between chronic bronchitis and long-term exposure to air  
pollution (mainly particulate air pollution).

Public Health England, April 2016 - read report  
(https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/comeap-long-term-exposure-to-air-pollution-and-chronic-bronchitis)

- o -

28) Fine particulate matter components and mortality in Greater  
Houston: Did the risk reduce from 2000 to 2011?

Suyang Liu, Kai Zhang

PM2.5 concentrations were associated with increased mortality risk. A  
few major PM2.5 components were associated with increased mortality  
risk. Associations were generally strongest in winter in Greater  
Houston. Effect estimates of PM2.5 mass had reduced from 2000–2005 to  
2006–2011.

Science of The Total Environment 538, 15 December 2015, 162–168 - read  
abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969715305404)

- o -

29) Fine Particle Pollution, Alanine Transaminase, and Liver Cancer: A  
Taiwanese Prospective Cohort Study (REVEAL-HBV)

Wen-Chi Pan, Chih-Da Wu, Mu-Jean Chen, Yen-Tsung Huang, Chien-Jen  
Chen, Huey-Jen Su and Hwai-I Yang

Long-term PM2.5 exposure increased the risk for liver cancer, and  
chronic inflammation of the liver may underlie the pathogenesis.

J Natl Cancer Inst (2016) 108 (3): djv341 - read abstract  
(http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/content/108/3/djv341.abstract)

- o -

30) Fine Particulate Air Pollution and Hospital Emergency Room Visits  
for Respiratory Disease in Urban Areas in Beijing, China, in 2013

Qin Xu, Xia Li, Shuo Wang, Chao Wang, Fangfang Huang, Qi Gao, Lijuan  
Wu, Lixin Tao, Jin Guo, Wei Wang , Xiuhua Guo

PM2.5 was significantly associated with respiratory ERV, particularly  
for URTI, LRTI and AECOPD in Beijing. The susceptibility to PM2.5  
pollution varied by gender and age.

PlosOne April 2016 - read article  
(http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0153099)

- o -

31) Effects of particulate matter exposure on multiple sclerosis  
hospital admission in Lombardy region, Italy

Laura Angelici, Mirko Piola, Tommaso Cavalleri, Giorgia Randi,  
Francesca Cortini, Roberto Bergamaschi, Andrea A Baccarelli, Pier  
Alberto Bertazzi, Angela Cecilia Pesatori, Valentina Bollati

We investigated the association between exposure to PM10 and risk of  
MS hospitalization. Increasing in PM10 exposure was associated with  
higher RR of hospitalization for MS. The maximum effect was found for  
Pm10 exposure between days 0 and 7. Air pollution may have a role in  
determining MS occurrence and relapses.

Environmental Research 145, February 2016, 68–73 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935115301456)

- o -

32) Occupational vehicle-related particulate exposure and inflammatory  
markers in trucking industry workers

Yueh-Hsiu Mathilda Chiu, Eric Garshick, Jaime E. Hart, Donna  
Spiegelman, Douglas W. Dockery, Thomas J. Smith, Francine Laden

Associations between vehicular air pollutants and inflammatory markers  
were examined. We focused on non-drivers of truck terminal workers as  
literature is mainly in drivers. Short-term exposure to OC and EC may  
be associated with increased sICAM-1.

Environmental Research 148, July 2016, 310–317 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116301323)

- o -

33) On-bicycle exposure to particulate air pollution: Particle number,  
black carbon, PM2.5, and particle size

Steve Hankey, Julian D. Marshall

Monitored particulate air pollution for 85 h (1426 km) in a city while  
cycling. ∼50% of Black Carbon (BC) and Particle Number (PN)  
concentrations were from near-traffic emissions. BC and PN were  
correlated with street type and declined short distances from major  
roads. Presence of nearby trucks was associated with highly elevated  
concentrations of particulates.

Atmospheric Environment 122, December 2015, 65–73 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231015303678)

- o -

34) The modifying effect of socioeconomic status on the relationship  
between traffic, air pollution and respiratory health in elementary  
schoolchildren

Sabit Cakmak, Christopher Hebbern, Jasmine D. Cakmak, Jennifer Vanos

We studied the modification of traffic and air pollution effects on  
respiratory health by SES in children. The risk of developing  
respiratory conditions was increased (exacerbated) in low income and  
education groups. Lung function declined with traffic and pollutant  
exposure in low income groups. Traffic and air pollution present  
higher health risks in lower socioeconomic groups.

Journal of Environmental Management 177, 15 July 2016, 1–8 - read  
article  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301479716301566)

- o -

35) Real-time indoor and outdoor measurements of black carbon at  
primary schools

C. Reche, I. Rivas, M. Pandolfi, M. Viana, L. Bouso, M.  
Àlvarez-Pedrerol, A. Alastuey, J. Sunyer, X. Querol

Indoor and outdoor Equivalent Black Carbon (EBC) measured at 39  
primary schools. Indoor exposures greatly determined by outdoor  
concentrations. Strong dependency of indoor and outdoor EBC levels on  
the distance to traffic. Mean EBC at different districts related with  
the surface area used for road network. Indoor/outdoor ratios >1 at  
nights maybe linked to the airtightness of the classroom.

Atmospheric Environment 120, November 2015, 417–426 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231015302892)

- o -

36) Understanding how roadside concentrations of NOx are influenced by  
the background levels, traffic density, and meteorological conditions  
using Boosted Regression Trees

Arwa Sayeg, James E. Tat, Karl Ropkins

Air quality at urban, motorway, and tunnel sites has been studied and  
compared. New method has been developed for splitting traffic data to  
four traffic states. Deriving traffic influence on roadside NOx  
depends on the quality of background NOx. Different traffic states  
have been shown to have different influence on roadside NOx. Roadside  
NOx appears to reach a minimum at around 22 °C of ambient air  
temperature.

Atmospheric Environment 127, February 2016, 163–175 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231015305914)

- o -

37) Air quality improvements following implementation of Lisbon's Low  
Emission Zone

F. Ferreira, P. Gomes, H. Tente, A.C. Carvalho, P. Pereira, J. Monjardino

PM10 and NO2 levels in Lisbon have been exceeding the legal limit  
values since 2001. An action plan was developed with a set of measures  
including a LEZ in Lisbon. We assessed air quality and traffic data  
before and after LEZ full implementation. Results show positive  
evolution between 2011 (before LEZ) and 2013 (after LEZ). Stricter  
restrictions and enforcement are fundamental in future stages of the  
LEZ.
Atmospheric Environment 122, December 2015, 373–381 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231015304064)

- o -

38) Measuring exposure levels of inhalable airborne particles (PM2.5)  
in two socially deprived areas of Nairobi, Kenya

Thaddaeus Egondi, Kanyiva Muindi, Catherine Kyobutungi, Michael  
Gatari, Joacim Rocklöv

Air pollution in urban poor residential areas remain a health burden.  
The level of PM2.5 concentration in urban slum of Nairobi exhibit  
temporal variation. The level of PM2.5 concentration in Nairobi slums  
exceeds WHO recommended limits.

Environmental Research 148, July 2016, 500–506 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116300974)

- o -

39) Short-term exposure to air pollution and morbidity of COPD and  
asthma in East Asian area: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Siqi Zhang, Guoxing Li, Lin Tian, Qun Guo, Xiaochuan Pan

Evidence was found that short-term exposure to air pollution was  
associated with increasing risk of hospital utilization for COPD and  
asthma in the whole population, the elderly and children, but not in  
people aged 15–64. Children tended to be more susceptible to the  
effect of air pollution on asthma morbidity.

Environmental Research 148, July 2016, 15–23 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116300883)

- o -

40) Long term exposure to NO2 and diabetes incidence in the Black  
Women's Health Study

Patricia F. Coogan, Laura F. White, Jeffrey Yu, Richard T. Burnett,  
Julian D. Marshall, Edmund Seto, Robert D. Brook, Julie R. Palmer,  
Lynn Rosenberg, Michael Jerrett

Assessed association of NO2 levels and diabetes incidence in the Black  
Women's Health Study cohort. NO2 levels estimated from a land use  
regression model and from a dispersion model. No association between  
NO2 levels and diabetes risk in 22 years of follow-up.

Environmental Research 148, July 2016, 360–366 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116301463)

- o -

41) A structured review of panel studies used to investigate  
associations between ambient air pollution and heart rate variability

Stephane Buteau, Mark S. Goldberg

We were not persuaded by the results that there was an association  
between PM2.5 and any of the four indices of heart rate variability.  
For NO2 and O3 the number of high-quality studies was insufficient to  
draw any definite conclusions. Further panel studies with improved  
design and methodologies are needed to help establish or refute an  
association between ambient exposure to air pollution and heart rate  
variability.

Environmental Research 148, July 2016, 207–247 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116300925)

- o -

42) Use of Dieselized Farm Equipment and Incident Lung Cancer:  
Findings from the Agricultural Health Study Cohort

Séverine Tual, Debra T. Silverman, Stella Koutros, Aaron Blair, Dale  
P. Sandler, Pierre Lebailly, Gabriella Andreotti, Jane A. Hoppin,  
Laura E. Beane Freeman

This study provides preliminary evidence of an increased risk of lung  
adenocarcinoma among daily drivers of diesel tractors and suggests  
that exposure to endotoxins may modify the impact of diesel exposure  
on lung cancer risk. Confirmation of these findings with more exposed  
cases and more detailed exposure information is warranted.

Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/ehp.1409238 - read article  
(http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/14-09238/)

- o -

43) Evaluation of diesel fleet emissions and control policies from  
plume chasing measurements of on-road vehicles

Chui Fong Lau, Agata Rakowska, Thomas Townsend, Peter Brimblecombe,  
Tat Leung Chan, Yat Shing Yam, Griša Močnik, Zhi Ning

Gini coefficient was used to quantify the inequality of emission  
within fleets. Multi-pollutant control strategy needs to control  
vehicle emissions. There exist high emitters even in newer vehicle  
fleets. Identification and removal of high emitters is a  
cost-effective emission control.

Atmospheric Environment 122, December 2015, 171–182 - read article  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231015303903)

- o -

44) Impact of trees on pollutant dispersion in street canyons: A  
numerical study of the annual average effects in Antwerp, Belgium

Stijn Vranckx, Peter Vos, Bino Maiheu, Stijn Janssen

Simulation of annual average effects of street canyon trees on local  
air quality. Concentration increases of 0.2% to 2.6% for PM10 and 1%  
to 13% for EC. Annual average effects are considerably smaller than  
earlier estimates. Extensive validation of CFD results against wind  
tunnel data.

Science of The Total Environment 532, 1 November 2015, 474–483 - read  
abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S004896971530228X)

- o -

45) Passive control potentials of trees and on-street parked cars in  
reduction of air pollution exposure in urban street canyons

K.V. Abhijith, Sharad Gokhale

Trees and on-street parked cars can manipulate pollutant levels in  
street canyons. Low stand density trees with 0° or 90° car parking  
reduce pedestrian exposure. Trees with medium crown, high porosity,  
low stand density reduce pollutant levels.

Environmental Pollution 204, September 2015, 99–108 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S026974911500202X)

- o -

46) Passive methods for improving air quality in the built  
environment: A review of porous and solid barriers

John Gallagher, Richard Baldauf, Christina H. Fuller, Prashant Kumar,  
Laurence W. Gill, Aonghus McNabola

Porous and solid barriers can act as passive methods for improving air  
quality. Experimental or modelling studies don't capture all  
complexities of dispersion. Passive barriers offer other benefits  
(shading, noise reduction, aesthetics, eco-system service). These  
passive barriers can be implemented as new or retrofitted from  
existing systems. Developing design guidelines is required before it  
is adopted by urban planners.

Atmospheric Environment 120, November 2015, 61–70 - read abstract  
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231015303204)

- o -

----------------------------------------------------------

Compiler and Editor: Barbara Rimmington, Researcher, East End Quality
of Life Initiative

10 Montgomery Terrace Road

Sheffield S6 3BU

Tel. 0114 285 9931

Fax 0114 278 7173

Visit/Like our blog / archive  
(https://sheffieldeastend.wordpress.com/)  We are setting up an  
archive of our website (for the day when we are no longer actively  
updating it).

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/barbara.rimmington.3

Twitter (https://www.twitter.com/b_rimm/)

Website (http://www.sheffieldeastend.org.uk/index.htm)

============================================================






More information about the news mailing list